Childrens Book – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 05:40:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hiocpely.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hiocpely-icon.jpg Childrens Book – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ 32 32 Texas Schools Eliminate Children’s Books Tagged “Critical Race Theory” https://hiocpely.com/texas-schools-eliminate-childrens-books-tagged-critical-race-theory/ https://hiocpely.com/texas-schools-eliminate-childrens-books-tagged-critical-race-theory/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 02:44:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/texas-schools-eliminate-childrens-books-tagged-critical-race-theory/ October 6 (Reuters) – A Texas school district removed two Jerry Craft books from its libraries and postponed his virtual appearance in front of students after parents complained that his graphic novels teach critical race theory, May -be in violation of a new state law. The Katy Independent School District near Houston fueled the latest […]]]>

October 6 (Reuters) – A Texas school district removed two Jerry Craft books from its libraries and postponed his virtual appearance in front of students after parents complained that his graphic novels teach critical race theory, May -be in violation of a new state law.

The Katy Independent School District near Houston fueled the latest controversy over critical race theory, a once obscure university concept. White conservatives have rallied to ban it in schools, arguing it exaggerates America’s racist history.

The theory, which examines how American institutions might be inherently racist, is taught primarily in law school.

Local television station KPRC first reported the book’s ban. Craft said on Wednesday that the petition to ban his books also resulted in his appearance before the students being postponed.

A Texas law that came into effect on September 1 restricts discussions of race and history in schools. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott said the law was a “strong movement to abolish critical race theory.”

Craft’s “New Kid” and its “Class Act” sequel tells the stories of minority students who enroll in a predominantly white private school. Her work has won the Newbery Medal, the Coretta Scott King Author’s Award and the Kirkus Award, according to her website.

Schools in Katy, which the district website says serve nearly 89,000 students, have “temporarily” removed books from libraries, KPRC said, citing a district spokesperson. NBC, citing a district representative, said Craft’s appearance scheduled for Monday has been postponed.

Reuters could not reach officials at Katy’s school on Wednesday evening.

Bonnie Anderson, one of the parents who opposed the books, told KPRC: “This is inappropriate educational material.

“The books don’t come out and say, ‘We want white kids to feel like oppressors,’ but that’s absolutely what they will do,” Anderson said.

Craft, who is African-American, said his books aimed to “show children of color like ordinary children.”

“I hardly ever saw children like me in any of the books assigned to me at school. Books for children like me seemed to only deal with history or misery,” he said. Craft said, adding that he was also trying to include “strong value” messages. , loving families, very supportive friends and a lot of humor. “

Reporting by Daniel Trotta; Editing by Leslie Adler

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Otter revel in children’s book adventure with message https://hiocpely.com/otter-revel-in-childrens-book-adventure-with-message/ https://hiocpely.com/otter-revel-in-childrens-book-adventure-with-message/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/otter-revel-in-childrens-book-adventure-with-message/ FASTER BRADEN / STUFF Watercolourist Jane Smith illustrated and wrote her first book, Mr Otter and the River. An artist from Nelson has written a picture book that features animals to explore their own world and real world problems. Mr Otter and the River is a 32 page photo for young children. The picture book […]]]>
Watercolourist Jane Smith illustrated and wrote her first book, Mr Otter and the River.

FASTER BRADEN / STUFF

Watercolourist Jane Smith illustrated and wrote her first book, Mr Otter and the River.

An artist from Nelson has written a picture book that features animals to explore their own world and real world problems.

Mr Otter and the River is a 32 page photo for young children.

The picture book was written and illustrated by Tasmanian illustrator and watercolorist Jane Smith. This is Smith’s first book.

The picture book explores the life of Mr. Otter and his friends, a squirrel and a hedgehog. The three of them live by a river, in a “very calm” setting.

READ MORE:
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RNZ

The arts are proving to be a powerful tool in helping Kiwis get through the Covid-19 pandemic.

But their peaceful life is disrupted by loud beavers, then by a flood.

Smith said one of the themes of the book is climate change, with a river overflowing something that many children will experience in their lifetimes.

Another theme is not to mistreat people because they are different. Beavers have European accents, and Mr. Otter guesses he’s going to have to say “what’s up” in the valley. Instead, he ends up depending on their hospitality.

“It’s about not taking people at face value.”

Mr Otter and the River was inspired by Smith's childhood in the south of England.

FASTER BRADEN / STUFF

Mr Otter and the River was inspired by Smith’s childhood in the south of England.

The book can either be read by a five-year-old or be read by an eight to ten-year-old, Smith said.

The artist was inspired by his education in the south of England. The area where she grew up had otters, and conservationists recently reintroduced the animals to the area.

Smith arrived in New Zealand in 2002 with her husband. They left behind fast paced corporate jobs in London for a slower pace of life.

Smith is a full-time illustrator and graphic designer, and is also known for her watercolors of the Tasman area.

The idea of Monsieur Otter and the river came from Smith’s brother, who told her she should paint a picture book with animals, and gave her the outline of the story.

Smith said the project was perfect for her as she adores animals. During the lockdown, she thought she might as well illustrate something she liked.

Jane Smith will launch her book Mr Otter and the River at the Wall To Wall Gallery on Bridge St on October 6 from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. She will sell prints of interior artwork from the book and exhibit there for a month. You can buy Mr Otter and the River here.

MARTIN DE RUYTER / stuff

Artist Nelson Sean Garwood with the painting he produced following his trip to Antarctica. The painting is from Shackleton’s Hut on Cape Royds. (First published August 2017)

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Driscoll’s Latest Children’s Book Adapted to Include Extended Families in West Virginia | New https://hiocpely.com/driscolls-latest-childrens-book-adapted-to-include-extended-families-in-west-virginia-new/ https://hiocpely.com/driscolls-latest-childrens-book-adapted-to-include-extended-families-in-west-virginia-new/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/driscolls-latest-childrens-book-adapted-to-include-extended-families-in-west-virginia-new/ Bridgeport author Colleen Driscoll is hopeful the COVID-19 pandemic wears off and allows her to showcase her latest children’s book to local schools and libraries. Released in August, “Grandma, I Need a Hug” took Driscoll about a month to write. “It’s very similar to ‘Mum, I need a hug’ (a Driscoll book released in 2020), […]]]>

Bridgeport author Colleen Driscoll is hopeful the COVID-19 pandemic wears off and allows her to showcase her latest children’s book to local schools and libraries.

Released in August, “Grandma, I Need a Hug” took Driscoll about a month to write.

“It’s very similar to ‘Mum, I need a hug’ (a Driscoll book released in 2020), but I had different photos taken. I changed it in a small amount, but it is in the same room.

“I have had so many parents who told me that they thought a grandma version would be good, because nowadays so many children have their grandparents to watch them and sometimes children live with it. their grandparents. So I decided to make a sister version of the book for anyone who lines them up at night, ”Driscoll said.

“With COVID-19, it’s really hard to get started. I’m still available for author visits, but with COVID-19 this year, I’m not sure if any schools will offer them, ”she said.

“Mom I need a hug” was only released after COVID-19 last year, “so unfortunately it didn’t really have a chance to debut,” she said. declared.

Before COVID-19, Driscoll read to students in Harrison and Marion counties, as well as North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania. She had the opportunity to meet and greet young readers at this year’s Preston County Buckwheat Festival.

Driscoll is now focusing on the sequel to his adult romance / thriller trilogy “Euphoria”, released as C. Becker, which is Driscoll’s maiden name. The first novel in the trilogy, “Finding Euphoria,” was released in 2019, and she hopes to release the second novel this spring via Wild Rose Press.

“I also worked on an adult novel which takes a lot of my time. The first book took about six years, so I was really happy when it was published, ”Driscoll said.

She added that “Finding Euphoria” is about a woman who gave her child up for adoption and is now trying to save her life after trying drugs and is dying.

The second novel will have the same characters, but in the first book the drug used was made from leaves and euphoria bark, while the second book uses the roots of the plant, she said.

The second novel is on another publishing cycle, so Driscoll said it was difficult to determine its release date.

Driscoll has also sought advice on his adult novels through a group of writers since 2016. The group met at Panera Bread on Emily Drive in Bridgeport until the COVID-19 pandemic required it. meetings to continue twice a month via Zoom.

After moving to Fairmont from New York, Pepper Hedden has been with the group for three years. Hedden is working on creative non-fiction, as well as a movement guide for seniors.

Hedden bought children’s books from Driscoll for her 3 and 6 year old granddaughters.

“These are delicious stories,” Hedden said. “(Driscoll) has a knack for reading to children and making up informative and joyful stories for them.”

Fairmont’s Gene Turchin has published adult science fiction and horror and has worked on a time travel novel for the past four years.

“I’ve been in a few writing groups at different times, and this one is absolutely the most productive and useful,” he said. “We have grown up together over the past five years and have really learned to help each other.

“There is a lot of science in discovering Colleen’s euphoria, it’s a turning point. The second book is even better and has a good plot.

Naomi Brown, who is taking graduate classes while being homeschooled in Flemington, illustrated Driscoll’s last three children’s books. “Grandma, I need a hug,” took Brown less than six months to illustrate.

“I started out as a writer, and that led to me starting to illustrate my own stories. I started drawing seriously in college and have several projects going on, ”Brown said. “It’s very easy to work with Colleen. She left a lot of creative freedom on the characters and the appearance of the pages. “

Driscoll met Brown while working at another local church almost ten years ago.

“Naomi is a talented artist who I really enjoy working with. Watching her draw and seeing the details she puts in her illustrations makes me appreciate her skills even more. Its portfolio is quite extensive, ”Driscoll said. “She is so talented. I know Naomi will be successful in her career, and I imagine she will someday work for Disney or some other big movie producer.

Brown, who admires the work of English illustrator Arthur Rackham and modern comic artist Mike Mignola, hopes to attend Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia.

Having written it since January, Driscoll also already has more than half of the final trilogy novel in draft form and plans to introduce new research themes. Driscoll was a former laboratory scientist in a Pennsylvania hospital lab.

“I have to make sure everything is going to make sense,” she said.

Driscoll has now written 10 children’s books and the adult novel. She balances writing with conducting the Bridgeport Presbyterian Church choir and spends time with her husband Paul, two grown sons and two grown daughters (with whom she loved to read). She also gave her children copies of the self-published children’s books to read to their children someday.

Nancy Hall in Shinnston is part of Driscoll’s adult choir and enjoys writing historical fiction.

“Colleen was very encouraging with my writing. I was writing sci-fi and stumbled across writer’s block, but Colleen kept cheering me on, ”Hall said.

Hall pre-ordered “Find the Euphoria” and read it electronically overnight. She also plans to pre-order the rest of the trilogy as soon as they become available.

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Crayola, Tra Publishing and the Kids In Need Foundation team up to share messages of diversity and inclusion in underserved schools with Colors of the World pencils and Alice Walker’s new children’s book “Sweet People are Everywhere “ https://hiocpely.com/crayola-tra-publishing-and-the-kids-in-need-foundation-team-up-to-share-messages-of-diversity-and-inclusion-in-underserved-schools-with-colors-of-the-world-pencils-and-alice-walkers-new-childrens-b/ https://hiocpely.com/crayola-tra-publishing-and-the-kids-in-need-foundation-team-up-to-share-messages-of-diversity-and-inclusion-in-underserved-schools-with-colors-of-the-world-pencils-and-alice-walkers-new-childrens-b/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 13:23:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/crayola-tra-publishing-and-the-kids-in-need-foundation-team-up-to-share-messages-of-diversity-and-inclusion-in-underserved-schools-with-colors-of-the-world-pencils-and-alice-walkers-new-childrens-b/ When drawing the illustration for “Sweet People Are Everywhere”, the illustrator Quim Torres used Crayola art tools, including Colors of the World skin-colored pencils, to depict images and scenes from around the world that showcase softness. The 24 formulated skin tone colors, launched in 2020, give children the ability to fully and accurately represent themselves […]]]>

When drawing the illustration for “Sweet People Are Everywhere”, the illustrator Quim Torres used Crayola art tools, including Colors of the World skin-colored pencils, to depict images and scenes from around the world that showcase softness. The 24 formulated skin tone colors, launched in 2020, give children the ability to fully and accurately represent themselves and the world around them through creativity, imagination and self-expression. To help support the diversity and inclusion message, Crayola is donating Colors of the World pencil packs to children in 24 different underserved school districts across the country, along with copies of “Sweet People Are Everywhere.”

“I am delighted to share my new children’s book, ‘Sweet People Are Everywhere.’ The words are taken from a poem I wrote that celebrates the good people, the sweet people, found all over the world. In the poem I write about the unity of the inhabitants of the Earth and our similarities, we are all connected to the same life which sustains us force, which is nature ”, said Alice walker. “I am also happy to share that through a partnership with Crayola, Kids In Need Foundation and Tra Publishing, a total of 5,000 Sweet People Are Everywhere books and over 11,000 Crayola Colors of the World pencils will be donated to children. in need. across the country. I hope you all enjoy the book, share it with your families, and help live and spread this important message of connectivity. “

In support of the outing, Crayola Education has developed a teacher’s guide activity kit that celebrates the inclusive ideas shared in “Sweet People are Everywhere”. With this activity guide, children discover different countries and all they have in common with the lovely people who live there. The kit provides the ability to read, create, present and connect with students using the coloring pages and encourages independence and imaginative thinking. In addition, Crayola Education will be organizing a Facebook Live “Read Along, Draw Along” event with Alice walker to 12 October 2021 To 2 p.m. / ET. Walker will share a read and the story behind his children’s book for the very first time, followed by a one-on-one interview by James wells, responsible for innovative teaching and learning with Crayola Education. Participants will also learn how the illustrator Quim Torres used Colors of the World throughout the children’s book. The link to view the event is here.

“When Crayola launched Colors of the World, we wanted to give kids the ability to color themselves and the world they see around them through their own eyes,” said Mimi Dixon, Director Brand activation and Content at Crayola. “We were delighted to hear that Colors of the World would be used to illustrate ‘Sweet People Are Everywhere’, to contribute to the book’s message running through us all, in the best way that Crayola can, through color. . We are excited to advance the message of inclusion and advocacy and give back to underserved school districts with the Kids In Need Foundation. “

“At the Kids In Need Foundation, we believe that every child deserves access to a quality education and the necessary supplies for it,” says Jennifer lehman, Senior Director of Corporate Development and Partnerships at the Kids In Need Foundation. “With the donation from Crayola and Tra Publishing, thousands of children in 24 underserved school districts will have the opportunity to better understand the world around them and to create art that is more accurately represented.”

“Sweet People Are Everywhere” will be released on November 2, 2021 and can be found at retailers nationwide. The book is currently available for pre-order on Amazon.

About Crayola
Crayola LLC, based in Easton, Pennsylvania. and a subsidiary of Hallmark Cards, Incorporated, is the world leader in children’s creative expression products. Known for the iconic Crayola Crayon first introduced in 1903, the Crayola brand has grown into a portfolio of innovative art tools, craft activities, and creative toys that provide children with innovative new ways to use the color to create anything imaginable. Consumers can find the wide range of Crayola products in the “Crayola Aisle” at all major retailers. For more information, visit www.crayola.com or join the community at www.facebook.com/crayola.

About Tra Publishing
Tra Publishing creates beautifully crafted books on fine and decorative arts, architecture and design that inspire social, cultural and environmental awareness. Tra started publishing children’s books in 2020, with bestselling And the People Stayed Home by Kitty o’meara. The company is passionate about books and passionate about the contribution each book can make. Profits from many Tra titles are donated to environmental, artistic and activist organizations. Situated at Miami, Tra was founded in 2016 by a graphic designer and author Ilona Oppenheim. Tra’s books are distributed worldwide by Simon & Schuster. For more information, visit www.trapublishing.com. Follow Tra on Instagram @trapublishing.

About the Kids In Need Foundation
Kids In Need Foundation (KINF), a nonprofit organization that believes every child in America deserves equal opportunity and access to quality education, provides the support and tools for teachers to teach and for learners to learn. By providing essential school supplies, distance learning resources and other in-demand classroom items, KINF partners with teachers in underserved schools to ensure students are ready to learn in the classroom. In 2020, through its programs and national network of resource centers, comprised of more than 40 missionary organizations nationwide, KINF served approximately 5 million students, 205,000 teachers and provided more than $ 70 million in product at no cost to schools or teachers. For more information, visit KINF.org and join us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter: @KidsInNeed.

CONTACT: Marie hanna, [email protected]

SOURCE Crayola

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Seth Meyers’ picture book for children is an animal tale https://hiocpely.com/seth-meyers-picture-book-for-children-is-an-animal-tale/ https://hiocpely.com/seth-meyers-picture-book-for-children-is-an-animal-tale/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 18:56:59 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/seth-meyers-picture-book-for-children-is-an-animal-tale/ NEW YORK – Seth Meyers has dreams beyond hosting his own talk show. “I have wanted to write a story about a bear for a long time and I am grateful that Penguin gave me the opportunity,” Meyers said in a statement released Monday by Penguin publisher Random House Flamingo Books, which announced that Meyers’ […]]]>

NEW YORK – Seth Meyers has dreams beyond hosting his own talk show.

“I have wanted to write a story about a bear for a long time and I am grateful that Penguin gave me the opportunity,” Meyers said in a statement released Monday by Penguin publisher Random House Flamingo Books, which announced that Meyers’ illustrated story “I” I’m not afraid, you’re afraid! will be released on March 15.

This image provided by Penguin Random House, shows the cover of the children’s book “I’m Not Scared, You’re Scared!” By Seth Meyers.
PA

According to Flamingo, Meyers’ book is an adventure about a frightened bear and a calmer rabbit and how they each learn the true meaning of bravery. “I am not afraid, you are afraid!” features illustrations by Rob Sayegh Jr., and will also be released in an audio edition narrated by Meyers, whose children’s book author status is shared by late-night television peers like Jimmy Kimmel and Jimmy Fallon.

“I’m a huge fan of Seth, so having the opportunity to work with him on his first picture book is a dream come true,” said Margaret Anastas, vice president and publisher of Flamingo, in a statement. “Not only is this hilarious, but it will hopefully help parents tell children how important it is to talk about their feelings.”

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Local alum hopes to inspire others after publishing new children’s book https://hiocpely.com/local-alum-hopes-to-inspire-others-after-publishing-new-childrens-book/ https://hiocpely.com/local-alum-hopes-to-inspire-others-after-publishing-new-childrens-book/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 21:41:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/local-alum-hopes-to-inspire-others-after-publishing-new-childrens-book/ WILMINGTON, North Carolina (WECT) – When Wilmington native Kira Bigwood graduated from John T. Hoggard High School, she dreamed of writing and publishing children’s books. “I’ve been working on this for eight years,” Bigwood said. “I have over 100 story rejection letters that I sent out saying ‘no thanks’, but, you know, I learned from […]]]>

WILMINGTON, North Carolina (WECT) – When Wilmington native Kira Bigwood graduated from John T. Hoggard High School, she dreamed of writing and publishing children’s books.

“I’ve been working on this for eight years,” Bigwood said. “I have over 100 story rejection letters that I sent out saying ‘no thanks’, but, you know, I learned from those, some of them had notes that I would make these changes and that I would continue. “

After years of rejection, Bigwood’s dream of publishing a children’s book has finally come true. Bigwood is the author of a recently published children’s book. “It’s the first book I’ve published, but it’s not the first I’ve written. It’s probably the 10th book I’ve ever written, ”Bigwood said.

Bigwood’s latest book, “Secret, Secret Agent Guy,” was recently released, bringing her back to her hometown for a little book tour. “I’m going to be in schools next week doing tours and being able to kind of inspire this next generation of creative thinkers is really inspiring,” Bigwood said.

“It’s a lullaby for little spies, an 007 version of ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,’” Bigwood explained.

Her inspiration for the book came from her children, and years of rejection motivated her to reach the moment she had been waiting for some time now.

The book is available online and in stores, click here for a list of places to buy “Secret, Secret Agent Guy”.

Copyright 2021 WECT. All rights reserved.

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DuPage Children’s Museum brings questioners’ books to life https://hiocpely.com/dupage-childrens-museum-brings-questioners-books-to-life/ https://hiocpely.com/dupage-childrens-museum-brings-questioners-books-to-life/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 21:03:44 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/dupage-childrens-museum-brings-questioners-books-to-life/ “I have always had a soft spot for this place. So to think that this group of talented people would come up with an exhibition for these books was beyond my imagination. It was wonderful, ”said Andrea Beaty, author of the Questioneers book series. People contacts at DCM The DuPage Children’s Museum (DCM) presents a […]]]>

“I have always had a soft spot for this place. So to think that this group of talented people would come up with an exhibition for these books was beyond my imagination. It was wonderful, ”said Andrea Beaty, author of the Questioneers book series.

People contacts at DCM

The DuPage Children’s Museum (DCM) presents a new exhibit that brings the characters of this author of children’s books to life. “The Questioneers are a series of books about passion, curiosity, bravery, art and creativity,” said Beaty. “Just really the traits that every child has.”

The Naperville-based author explores these traits with Iggy Peck, architect, Sofia Valdez, Future Prez, Ada Twist, scientist, and Rosie Revere, engineer.

“It was such a natural fit. And with Andrea Beaty being an author based here in Naperville, the New York Times bestselling books align directly with our mission and vision, ”said Andrea Wiles, President and CEO of DuPage Children’s Museum. “I mean we all want to foster joyful discovery and learning and that’s 100% about what all of these characters are. Ada and Iggy and Sofia and Rosie. They want to have fun and experience the world around them, and that’s DCM.

Each character is different and unique in their own way. And that’s thanks to the books’ illustrator, David Roberts. “I love it so much because when I go to school I look and it’s the same class of kids looking at me where there are always so many types of kids,” Beaty said. “It’s so important for every child to see themselves, to see their family, to see their community, to see a connection to their real life in the books. “

Exhibition of questioners

Children visiting “The Questioners: Read. Question. Think. Play! ”Will be able to interact with the characters and put themselves in their shoes through hands-on experiences. In addition to books, Ada Twist, Scientist now has his own series on Netflix. But it’s the joy of their trip home that talks to Beaty the most. “It’s so. It’s wonderful,” Beaty said.

The Questioneers is the first exhibit the museum has built and is now open. The young characters will be there until next September before traveling the country.

“We are a permanent iconic location at the gateway to Naperville. We have to make sure we’re here for decades to come, ”Wiles said. “And that means we’re always creative and thoughtful about how we can not only serve our audience, but also help other organizations achieve this vision of ensuring access to extraordinary learning experiences so that all children can flourish. “

Aysha Ashley Househ of Naperville News 17 reports.

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‘Kisaan’: Monrovia children’s author publishes book to honor grandfather and spotlight Indian farmers | Books https://hiocpely.com/kisaan-monrovia-childrens-author-publishes-book-to-honor-grandfather-and-spotlight-indian-farmers-books/ https://hiocpely.com/kisaan-monrovia-childrens-author-publishes-book-to-honor-grandfather-and-spotlight-indian-farmers-books/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/kisaan-monrovia-childrens-author-publishes-book-to-honor-grandfather-and-spotlight-indian-farmers-books/ A little girl with long dark braids and a little boy wearing a green turban are looking at the pages of a picture book, smiling happily under three bubbles. “My name is Simran,” said the little girl. “My name is Sehaj,” adds his brother. Then, together: “Join us on a journey to learn about the […]]]>

A little girl with long dark braids and a little boy wearing a green turban are looking at the pages of a picture book, smiling happily under three bubbles.

“My name is Simran,” said the little girl.

“My name is Sehaj,” adds his brother.

Then, together: “Join us on a journey to learn about the Kisaans of India and our great-grandfather, who was a Kisaan. “

So begins “Kisaan,” the latest children’s book by Simarjeet Kaur Sandhu, a resident of Monrovia and recent Hood College graduate.

In “Kisaan,” which means farmer in Punjabi, readers learn about the crops and livestock raised by farmers in the Indian states of Punjab and Haryana. They also meet Maluk Singh Sandhu, a very special kisaan who owned a 25 acre farm in the Haryana town of Pehowa and taught his great-grandchildren, Simran and Sehaj, to be grateful for the work of the farmers. After all, as Simran tells readers, “If there were no farmers, there would be no food.

Maluk Singh Sandhu is special for another reason too. He was the grandfather of Simarjeet Kaur Sandhu. She wrote “Kisaan” as a tribute to him and to raise awareness of the importance of farmers, a cause she sees as particularly urgent in light of the ongoing protests by farmers in India.

For just over a year, farmers have rallied at the state borders surrounding Delhi to oppose three new farm laws passed last September that they fear will harm their livelihoods and harm their livelihoods. Make it harder for them to compete with large private retailers and food processors. Sandhu’s relatives who still live in the Punjab made the trip to New Delhi to provide food for the homeless and protesters in the city. In doing so, Sandhu explained, they make “langar” (Punjabi for “free cooking”) an important part of Sikhism.

Sandhu’s grandfather died last September at the age of 104, before his family knew about the protests. Nonetheless, Sandhu says she is sure he would be upset by the laws and want people to know about them.

“He was a great defender,” she said. “He taught us to fight social injustice and truly honor people’s lives and their differences.

The story of “Kisaan” does not mention the protests. Although Sandhu sees the passing of laws as a humanitarian rather than a political issue, she did not want to distract from the reason she wrote the book, to introduce readers to the basic concepts of agriculture and the importance of farmers.

The final pages of Sandhu’s picture book highlight two organizations that support protesting farmers. During the first three months after the publication of her book by Sandhu, she donated all profits to these two organizations – half to the 5 Rivers Heart Association, which provides free medical care to underserved areas of the world, and the other half to Khalsa Aid, which provides support to people. victims of natural and man-made disasters.

As of September 1, Sandhu said that all income collected by “Kisaan” will be used to fund a scholarship that she created on behalf of her grandfather, open to undergraduate and graduate students in all majors.

The children’s book also features a brief explanation of the farmers’ protest, adapted from an essay that Sandhu’s niece, 14-year-old Mia Kaur Sandhu, wrote for the class. Mia also helped design the characters Simran and Sehaj, who also feature in her aunt’s first two books.

In an email, Mia spoke passionately about the challenges farmers face and the impact helping her aunt with “Kisaan” has had on her. Although she is only half Punjabi and does not speak the language, she is proud of where she came from and who her ancestors are.

“My favorite thing that I learned while working on the book was the bravery and humility that Bhaiji transmitted,” she wrote. “I learned from him that we have to remember who we are and where we come from. We have to support the people who support us. Farmers give us the food we need to survive; why can’t we repay them for the life they have planted in us? “

Sandhu says she is inspired by Mia and her sister. They remind her why it is so important to have books that teach readers about Sikhism and Indian culture. She wants them and other second and third generation immigrants to understand their origins.

Growing up in Silver Spring, Sandhu never saw her cultural or religious identity reflected in the books that filled her classroom. She and her brother have also been harassed by children and adults. Once a friend of hers told her that her parents told her that Sikhs cover their hair because they have lice. Another time, a gym teacher called Sikhism a “stupid religion” in front of his whole class.

Sandhu believes that a kind of ignorance can be avoided if children learn about other cultures and religions when they are young. Now, as an ESOL teacher at the Montgomery County Public School Virtual Academy, Sandhu sees it as her responsibility to share books like “Kisaan” with her students.

Her friend recently told her to look at “Kisaan” as both a mirror and a window. It’s a mirror for little boys, like Sehaj, who cover their hair in turbans and still learn about their cultural backgrounds, and it’s a window for people who are completely new to the Sikh religion and know little about the Sikh religion. India.

“This story has both purposes,” Sandhu said. “And that’s for both audiences.”

“Kisaan” is also intended for adult readers, Sandhu said. She has just completed a 350-page thesis that she knows few people are likely to read. But the reason she loves children’s books is that they present ideas in a simplistic way that anyone can understand.

Sandhu illustrator Anastasiia Sokolova knew nothing about the protests in India until she started working on “Kisaan,” she said in an email. While working with Sandhu, however, she became interested not only in learning more about the protests, but also Indian culture in general.

“I am certainly very proud of [have met] Dr. Sandhu and illustrated three of his books, ”Sokolova wrote. “I believe that each of Dr Sandhu’s books will be an excellent guide to the world of India and its multi-faceted culture.”

Sandhu hadn’t always planned to write a children’s book about her grandfather and her farmers, she said, but as a Sikh, she believes God is leading her. One day, she woke up, and it was as if God was the one writing the words that eventually became “Kisaan”.

Her grandfather moved to the United States in 1984. Although he eventually became a US citizen, she said he had firmly maintained his cultural and religious identity. When he arrived in the country, people told him he would need to cut his hair if he wanted a good job, Sandhu said. But he said he would be okay with any job he found. He ended up getting hired into a 7-Eleven and worked there for over a decade.

Education was also extremely important to his grandfather, Sandhu said. To honor her, she waited until she got her doctorate in organizational leadership before publishing “Kisaan”, so that she could be identified as a “Dr.” on its cover. And when she defended her thesis, she did so with her head covered.

“It was a huge tribute to me for him,” she said. “It just seemed like all of these pieces fit together, and that’s what he really wanted. This is really what he wanted.

Follow Angela Roberts on Twitter: @ 24_angier

Follow Angela Roberts on Twitter: @ 24_angier

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Children’s books: the review of “Pony” by RJ Palacio https://hiocpely.com/childrens-books-the-review-of-pony-by-rj-palacio/ https://hiocpely.com/childrens-books-the-review-of-pony-by-rj-palacio/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 14:16:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/childrens-books-the-review-of-pony-by-rj-palacio/ This fall brings a bumper crop of remarkable children’s books by some of the most talented writers and illustrators working in the field. Even Homer nods, so, good warning, in the midst of this fall abundance, there’s a weird bruise or stain. But let’s start with perfection, will you? RJ Palacio’s novel “Pony” is hands […]]]>

This fall brings a bumper crop of remarkable children’s books by some of the most talented writers and illustrators working in the field. Even Homer nods, so, good warning, in the midst of this fall abundance, there’s a weird bruise or stain. But let’s start with perfection, will you?

RJ Palacio’s novel “Pony” is hands down the best children’s book I’ve read all year. This is a gorgeous, funny and heart-wrenching wonder from a book by the author of 2012’s “Wonder”. In Ohio in 1860, 12-year-old Silas Bird lives with his amateur scientist father and the ghost of a teenager, Mittenwool, whom only Silas can see. When a gang armed with forgers takes Silas’ father away, he sets off after him on an unusual white-faced pony.

Ms. Palacio interweaves her chapters with ancient daguerreotypes, and she recalls the voyages of Ulysses and Telemachus, as well as other classic tales, to create a brilliant story of love and courage. “The ties that unite us are amazing,” Silas reflects. “The invisible threads weave in and around us, and pull us into places and times we may never see, or which only make sense with time.”

Kaleidoscope

By Brian Selznick

School

211 pages

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Establishing unsuspected connections between people, objects and places is a specialty of Brian Selznick, whose gift for mixing words and images produced magnificent effects in “The invention of Hugo Cabret” (2007), ” Wonderstruck ”(2011) and“ The Merveilles ”(2015). It would be rude to complain about the connections he makes in “Kaleidoscope”, so, okay, I’ll be a joke.

The book consists of seemingly unrelated short stories, all told in the first person, but not by the same person, and most of them featuring a character called James. Like the shining shards of glass in a kaleidoscope, the elements reproduce and change position from story to story: angels and butterflies appear and disappear, as well as dreams, keys, ships and elephants. . The problem is, it’s not a children’s book. There is not much to attach the young reader to the characters, while the ambiguity and underlying pain of the book — Mr. Selznick wrote “Kaleidoscope” while estranged from husband during Covid-19 lockdowns – requires considerable investment in reading. This is fine for adult admirers of Mr. Selznick, who will love this carefully crafted and evocatively illustrated work, but it’s too much to expect from a 10 or 12 year old.


To look closer

Selections from “Kaleidoscope” by Brian Selznick

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Beatryce’s Prophecy

By Kate DiCamillo

Candlewick

256 pages

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Kate DiCamillo takes us to the Middle Ages in “The Beatryce Prophecy”, the wise and loving story of a wayward goat, a gentle monk, an orphaned cape and cloak and a child who prophesies he will overthrow a king. In Sophie Blackall’s footage, the child, Beatryce, gazes at us with clear, staring eyes, her head severed above the monastic habit she wears to conceal her identity, for the king of the kingdom knows the prophecy and wants the girl to be found. Ms. Blackall and Ms. DiCamillo both produce work marked by great delicacy of sentiment, so their association is inspired here. Our hearts are engaged, and our minds (Beatryce wonders, “What world do I live in now, and how will I live there?”) And our laughter.

So it’s disappointing that Ms. DiCamillo chooses how to make it illegal, in the medieval world of Beatryce, for girls to learn to read. This circumstance satisfies the modern desire to see courageous female characters overcome structural injustice, but it does the past a disservice. Most medieval people could neither read nor write, but women of high rank or with religious vocation were often well educated, from Marie of France in the 12th century to Thérèse d’Avila in the 16th century.


To look closer

Excerpts from ‘The Beatryce Prophecy’ by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

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He was a camel

By Kathi Appelt

Athenaeum

336 pages

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Kathi Appelt weaves a thread of non-fiction into a humorous and touching story in “Once Upon a Camel”. Our heroine is an elderly camel named Zada, the last of a herd to arrive in Texas in 1856. The action swings back in time between the nerve-wracking present of 1910, as a great sandstorm approaches. Zada and the two chicks perched on his head, and his past adventures which are fondly remembered. With playful writing (Zada grew up next to a “posh palace of Pasha”), Ms. Appelt entertains us with the frolics of birds while deepening our attachment to the old camel. Eric Rohmann’s monochrome images have a soft, sand-washed feel that is suitable for this warm adventure for readers ages 8 to 12.


To look closer

Excerpts from ‘Once Upon a Camel’ by Kathi Appelt, illustrated by Eric Rohmann

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Daughter of the Deep

By Rick Riordan

Disney

416 pages

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It’s Rick Riordan’s custom to turn old stories into entertaining news. Greek mythology inspired his accounts of a dyslexic demigod in college for 2005’s “The Lightning Thief” and its sequels, and Norse mythology provided material for his books “Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard”. In the upcoming “Daughter of the Deep”, he brings Jules Verne’s classic “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” to the waters off California today. In this fun and fast-paced action-adventure, Verne’s embittered Captain Nemo was, we are told, “a true 19th century person – a genius who created marine technology generations ahead of his time.” The biggest and most powerful breakthroughs were related to Nemo’s own body chemistry. Only a direct descendant of Nemo can exploit his inventions, which is why, after disaster and betrayal, high school freshman Ana Dakkar finds herself in control of her legacy. The homicides intend to steal Nemo’s technology. It’s up to Ana and her classmates to thwart them. Mr Riordan seems to have had fun channeling Verne’s futuristic vision and, as always, the fun, frothy guard. At one point, an autistic girl’s therapy dog ​​helps her owner in a fight, “by squeezing his jaws around the guy’s throat, which,” he writes, “is absolutely a form of support. emotional”.

It fell from the sky

By the fan brothers

Simon & Schuster Books for young readers

56 pages

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A luminous glass ball falls into the subdued gray world of caterpillars and insects in “It Fell From the Sky”, a picture book elegantly illustrated by Eric Fan and Terry Fan, creators of “The Night Gardener” (2016) and “The Barnabas Project” (2020). Everyone has a theory: it’s a gumball, a fallen star, a “magic chrysalis”. A large black spider recognizes a business opportunity, and soon it charges admission to see it. It doesn’t go well with the other creatures, whose displeasure prompts the Spider to take a more civic-minded approach to its next venture in this funny story for readers ages 4-8.


To look closer

Excerpts from “It Fell From the Sky” by the Fan Brothers

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A house

By Kevin Henkes

Green willow

32 pages

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Young children are in good hands when they open a book by Kevin Henkes, whose work for the 3-6 year-old cohort exudes gentleness and understanding. His latest, “A House”, “A House” (Greenwillow, 32 pages, $ 18.99), combines illustrations with clean lines and sherbet colors with gentle questions and comments. We see a house, with a tiled roof, a rectangular front door and a circular window on the second floor. Time comes and goes, birds and the sun too: “Where is the sun? Is it in place? We read. “Where are the birds?” Do they all steal? With the addition of people, “a house” becomes “a house” in this enchantingly simple picture book.


To look closer

Extracts from “A House” by Kevin Henkes

Green Willow / HarperCollins

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Library holding children’s book fair https://hiocpely.com/library-holding-childrens-book-fair/ https://hiocpely.com/library-holding-childrens-book-fair/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 07:51:19 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/library-holding-childrens-book-fair/ September 30 – WILLIMANTIC – In an effort to promote children’s literacy, the Willimantic Public Library is hosting the first Eastern Connecticut Children’s Book Fair on Saturday. The event, which will feature local authors and illustrators, will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Memorial Park. This is an effort to revive the children’s […]]]>

September 30 – WILLIMANTIC – In an effort to promote children’s literacy, the Willimantic Public Library is hosting the first Eastern Connecticut Children’s Book Fair on Saturday.

The event, which will feature local authors and illustrators, will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Memorial Park.

This is an effort to revive the children’s book fair that the former UConn Co-op has hosted for years.

“By partnering with local schools, universities, authors and an independent bookseller in eastern Connecticut, the Willimantic Public Library and the Friends (of the Willimantic Public Library) are employing the talent and resources of our community to create a regional literacy event, ”Friends of said Willimantic Public Library President Nancy Pettitt at the Windham City Council meeting on September 7.

Windham Public Schools, Eastern Connecticut State University, Dodd Human Rights Impact of the University of Connecticut, and the Windham School Readiness Council partnered with the Library and Friends of the Willimantic Public Library to host the event.

The aim is to make the fair an annual event.

The library will offer 40 children’s books written by the authors presented at the event.

“We will be offering other books as well, but we really wanted to introduce the authors who will be in attendance,” said Angela Fournier, Liaison Officer for School Readiness in Windham.

She said one of the goals of the event was to involve local writers.

“It’s really nice to read a book or find a book and know the person who wrote it is on the street or in the town next door,” Fournier said.

CHILDREN’S BOOK FAIR, Page 4

The event, which will feature local authors and illustrators, will take place Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Memorial Park in Willimantic.

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The children’s book fair is Saturday

Continued from page 1

Staff at the River Bend Bookstore in Glastonbury will be selling books from featured authors and others during the event from their book truck.

The following authors will read and discuss their books during the fair:

– UConn Professor Emeritus Marilyn Nelson, who is a former Connecticut Poet Laureate and three-time National Book Award finalist.

Nelson has written books for young adults on important historical figures and race issues.

—Windham resident Barbara McClintock, author and illustrator.

She has received five New York Times awards for “Best Illustrated” books, three ALA Notable Book Citations, two Golden Kite Honor awards, one Horn Book / Boston Globe Honor award.

Staff at the River Bend Bookstore in Glastonbury will be selling books from featured authors and others during the event from their book truck.

– Andrea Wisnewski, resident of Storrs, illustrator and author of children’s books who studied at Portland School of Art and UConn.

She won the “Best in Show” award at the New England Book Show in Boston for her illustrations in “Little Red Riding Hood”.

Wisnewski also illustrated “The Ink Garden of Brother Theopane” by CM Millan, which won the Connecticut Children’s Book Award in 2011.

—Windham resident Delia Berlin writes bilingual books for children ages 3 to 9.

She grew up in Argentina and Brazil, but spent her adult life in eastern Connecticut.

– Guilford resident Jason Marchi wrote a picture book for mid-level readers, “The Legend of Hobbomock: The Sleeping Giant,” which was a regional Barnes & Noble bestseller.

The book talks about the Quinnipiac tribal legend of the creation of the “Sleepy Giant” land formation in Hamden.

He won 14 awards for his second children’s book, “The Growing Sweater”.

Marchi founded a nonprofit organization in 1998 called the New Century Writer Awards, which operated for six years in partnership with Zoetrope: All Story magazine by Francis Ford Coppolla.

—Connecticut resident Sam Taylor will read an excerpt from her first teenage novel, “We Are the Fire,” at the fair.

Dodd Human Rights Impact program staff will have current and past award-winning and honored books for the Malika Penn Award for Human Rights, an annual award that recognizes authors who address human rights issues or themes in their work.

The recipient of the 2021 award is Kim Johnson, who wrote “This is My America,” a book about the unequal treatment of blacks in the criminal justice system.

Those wishing to make a donation to the Book Fair can do so by clicking on the “donate” link on the main page of the library’s website, www. willimantibrary. org. All donations of $ 50 or more will be considered as sponsorships. For more information on the book fair, call the library’s youth department at 860-465-3082.

Follow Michelle Warren on Twitter – @ mwarrentc.

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