Picture Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:47:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hiocpely.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hiocpely-icon.jpg Picture Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ 32 32 Uyen Tran: Sustainable textiles that could change the future of the fashion industry https://hiocpely.com/uyen-tran-sustainable-textiles-that-could-change-the-future-of-the-fashion-industry/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/uyen-tran-sustainable-textiles-that-could-change-the-future-of-the-fashion-industry/ Ladder works is a publishing platform for various picture books and online programs whose mission is to empower more than one million children to become social entrepreneurs. Our current series features our interplanetary journalist Spiffy’s interviews with inspiring social entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial ecosystem builders advancing the UN SDGs. Owl here! I’m back with the inside […]]]>

Ladder works is a publishing platform for various picture books and online programs whose mission is to empower more than one million children to become social entrepreneurs. Our current series features our interplanetary journalist Spiffy’s interviews with inspiring social entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial ecosystem builders advancing the UN SDGs.

Owl here! I’m back with the inside scoop on planet earth’s business leaders. As the only interplanetary journalist stationed on this blue planet, I am thrilled to present this galactic exclusive with Uyen Tran, the founder and CEO of TômTex Inc. Let’s see what he is doing to make a positive impact in the world.

Nice : Welcome Uyen! Let’s go. What challenge do you take up with TômTex Inc?

Uyen: Thanks for inviting me, Spiffy! TômTex is a revolutionary biobased material, created from two key ingredients: shell waste and fungi. The company’s vision is a cruelty-free and eco-friendly alternative to synthetic and animal leathers. It is made from 100% bio-based ingredients and natural colors with no tanning process or backing fabric. At the end of their life, TômTex products can be disassembled and reinjected into TômTex production or fully biodegradable in the natural environment. Not only do we use various waste materials as raw materials, but the production of TômTex also consumes significantly less water, energy and land use compared to the standard production of synthetic or animal leather.

Nice : It looks fantastic! What motivated you to do it?

Uyen: I grew up in Da Nang, Vietnam. It is the epicenter of the waste textile dump. I remember growing up wearing second-hand clothes, which were thrown away in western countries. It is devastating to see my hometown contaminated by textile pollution and leather manufacturing. I was a fashion designer for luxury fashion brands in New York and worked with many different types of leather and synthetic fabric. However, it always reminded me of home but also of those toxins. For this reason, I reoriented my career towards sustainable textiles and founded TômTex Inc.

Nice : How do you work for a more equitable world, would you say?

Uyen: TômTex relies on renewable resources and natural “waste” to realize its vision. We envision a world where people surround themselves with high-performance materials that come straight from waste, not fossil resources. We are working with biomaterials scientists in the United States and Vietnam to deploy technology that can be adapted and scaled to fit different regions and communities around the world. Using local resources and employing local labor, we will build a closed-loop production system to boost the local economy while maintaining and improving the quality of life and a sustainable environment at the to come up.

Nice : Tell me about a recent step/initiative by you or your organization. What impact does it have?

Uyen: With the rewards and support of the biotech community, building a strong team is my greatest achievement to date. Recently, we were thrilled to welcome a new co-founder and Chief Security Officer – Ross McBee from Columbia University. With a dedicated team of designers, scientists and business people, we work across industry boundaries to bring this sustainable material to everyone and to help protect the earth. At TômTex, I want to build a culture where everyone feels accepted, valued and has a sense of belonging. We create an environment that promotes transparency, trust, empowerment and empathy.

Nice : It looks terrific. Please share an experience where you faced failure and didn’t give up. What did you learn from this?

Uyen: Early in my career, I learned a valuable lesson when the material I chose for one of my designs was not a natural fabric, but a polyester fabric. In the end, the style was produced in 1,000 pieces, which contributed to textile pollution since the polyester fabric is not biodegradable for years. When I realized what I had done wrong, I immediately took responsibility. From this error, I always choose natural and sustainable fabrics rather than synthetics. After realizing the impact that materials have on us, I redirected my career to textile design with the vision of creating more sustainable materials.

Nice : What have you unexpectedly learned from someone recently?

Uyen: My nephew taught me that there is no one right way to do things. The fact that children learn to do things on their own often leads them to find better ways to accomplish their tasks. This is a simple yet comprehensive lesson that can be applied to the startup world, where I’ve had to adapt by adopting growth mindsets, learning new skills, and embracing flexibility. I believe the world would be a much more refreshing place if we all had more childlike mindsets.

Nice : Wise words, Uyen. Thank you for speaking with me today, it was an honor!

Uyen Tran is a textile materials researcher and designer originally from Viet Nam and now based in New York, who aims to establish a viable and comprehensive system of products made of biodegradable materials. Its goal is to create a sustainable and environmentally friendly business model based on zero waste and zero pollution. Uyen is passionate about technology and innovative concepts through revolutionary material revolution. (Nominated by Julie Wolf at IndieBio. First published on the Ladderworks website on January 14, 2022.)

© 2022 Ladderworks LLC. Edited by Anushree Nande. Artwork of Spiffy by Shreyas Navare. For the Ladderworks Digital Curriculum to help children in K-3 advance the UN SDGs, visit Spiffy’s Corner here.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

]]>
Why we need more folk tales instead of superhero stories https://hiocpely.com/why-we-need-more-folk-tales-instead-of-superhero-stories/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 05:07:17 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/why-we-need-more-folk-tales-instead-of-superhero-stories/ One of the most fascinating stories in Musharraf Ali Farooqi’s new book is that of Gondrani and Aasi Gaur. It shows how a young girl from the village of Shehr-e-Roghan used her wits to defeat a fiery demon, when everyone else around her had failed – and this bravery has nothing to do with age, […]]]>

One of the most fascinating stories in Musharraf Ali Farooqi’s new book is that of Gondrani and Aasi Gaur. It shows how a young girl from the village of Shehr-e-Roghan used her wits to defeat a fiery demon, when everyone else around her had failed – and this bravery has nothing to do with age, but with kindness and kindness in a person. Five of these tales are part of Farooqi South Asian Monster Talespublished by HarperCollins Children’s Books and illustrated by Michelle Farooqi. “Stories of heroes and monsters date back to the beginning of human life and are often found in folklore, the oldest literature of mankind. Like other inhabited places in the world, the geographic regions of South Asia, too, possess a great number of such stories – a testament to their people and their imaginations, ”writes Farooqi in the introduction.

Three of these tales, Gondrani and the fire demon Aasi Gaur from Balochistan, Meo Khai Soni, the fairy prince Shamsher and the cannibal giant Sri Badat by Gilgit, and Morriro and the Sindh sea monsterare published for the first time for children. “The story of Prince Saif, fairy Badri Jamala and Toraban Dev is mainly known in oral form in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, although it is told in many permutations in many cultures. The story of Raja Rasalu and the Ogres is taken from Adventures of Raja Rasaluone of the great legends of the Punjab, which unfortunately is not so well known to our children today, ”he writes. In an interview with Salonhe develops the Storykit program for kids and makes stories from the past relevant to kids.

Read also : Lounge Fiction: The Apprenticeship of Ranjit Lal

Your new book has a nice premise: monsters could have a human side, while there could be monstrous traits in humans as well. If you could talk about picking up on that theme?

I wanted to do a book on monsters and naturally, as we think of monsters, we think of their compulsions, if the monster is an animal, as in the case of the sea monster that Morriro fought; and premeditation if they look like humans, as in the case of Shri Badat, the carnivorous king of Gilgit. Then there are all-human monsters, which roam among us and premeditiously injure other humans under one guise or another. Either way, humans are the worst monsters, which is why their opposite, the human hero, whose compulsion is to help and protect people, must be celebrated because he redeems the human race.

How do the five stories you selected define the ideas of justice and higher cause mobilization for children?

Today we need more folk tales than superhero stories. Folk tales tell of events from the distant past when humans faced the double threat of exposure to nature and unstable human societies struggling for limited resources. Today we are again faced with the wrath of nature in the form of climate change, and the struggle for the limited resources needed to sustain modern human society has already begun. We are back in a dreary world and we will need many heroes who will have to write their own destiny by coming to the defense of those who are weaker and less fortunate than them. Therefore, it is important for children to read folk tales, where the heroes are not protected by imaginary superpowers but risk their lives for their beliefs.

Read also : Story books could be an early source of gender stereotypes

One can find many parallels with the stories of myths and legends around the world, especially that of Gondrani Devi. If you could talk about the universal appeal of such stories and find parallels in other literatures from different countries?

Christopher Booker in Seven basic plots (2004) mentions “Overcoming the Monster” as one of the basic themes of all storytelling traditions. From Beowulf at Jawsthe same story takes place in different contexts. These stories are popular because there is a clear line between good and evil, all reader’s sympathies go to the protagonist, and he or she cannot let go of the book until the monster is taken care of.

From ‘Meo Khai Soni, Fairy Prince Shamsher, and the Cannibal Giant Sri Badat’, a folk tale by Gilgit


Read also : How children’s literature can help normalize homosexuality

You’ve worked on creating an Urdu-language editing program specializing in children’s literature and classics. How are you making classical literature relevant to children through this initiative?

The goal of the Storykit program is to develop both familiarity and understanding of the classics from an early age. The program divides each classic into three book categories: picture books for elementary school children, chapter books for high school students, and fully annotated original editions of selected classics for the high school years. Once young readers have familiarized themselves with the story and the characters through picture books and board games customized for the story plot, interest is developed further through chapter books. , which reveal more detail and complexity in the story and the characters.

By the time the reader is a young adult, through repeated readings, discussions and games, the classic is set deep in the imagination and when the fully annotated text is provided the only challenge left is language. This, I believe, will not only bring the classics into the public consciousness, but also make them a part of our lives, as they were meant to be.

The pandemic has brought about the need for interactive and innovative storytelling. How do you combine technology with literature and education in Storykit, and how did you move that forward during the pandemic?

We started a program called Storytime by Storykit, where some of our storytellers recorded the stories for online viewing. At the start of the pandemic, we gamified basic health security education for covid-19 with play Corona Cruncher.

Read also : Sudha Murty sheds light on lesser-known myths for children

]]>
Tewksbury shows its generous spirit | News https://hiocpely.com/tewksbury-shows-its-generous-spirit-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/tewksbury-shows-its-generous-spirit-news/ TEWKSBURY – Families in Tewksbury have once again stepped up and joined in an effort to provide help and joy through generous donations to Lowell Healthy Families on their Mothers and Babies Day. The pandemic forced the online rally for the second year, but gifts were still collected for distribution by assigned home visitors to […]]]>

TEWKSBURY – Families in Tewksbury have once again stepped up and joined in an effort to provide help and joy through generous donations to Lowell Healthy Families on their Mothers and Babies Day. The pandemic forced the online rally for the second year, but gifts were still collected for distribution by assigned home visitors to each family.

Part of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and Eliot Human Community Services, the group is hosting a Christmas party for the highly vulnerable population the organization has served for over 16 years. The non-profit agency supports young mothers with children aged 0-3 with pre and postnatal education, nutritional counseling and services to help mother and baby thrive.

The agency serves Lowell, Tewksbury, Westford, Chelmsford, Dracut, Tyngsboro, Dunstable and Billerica and relies on caring home visitors to supervise and refer young clients. In some cases, young mothers are homeless, while others “couch” from house to house with their infants, relying on the generosity of friends and family to provide temporary shelter.

Some mothers find themselves in situations of violence. The lack of affordable housing has created difficult circumstances for these and countless families in the Merrimack Valley in “normal” times, and the pandemic has only exacerbated the problem.

Since the annual gathering was not possible this year, the residents of Tewksbury, who usually provide homemade baked goods for the big event, instead created ‘take out’ baking bags for 20 customers as well as 15 Staff. Several residents, including Lori Carriere, created handmade treat bags with reindeer antlers and fruit bowls with snowman faces.

Lisa and Sam Gill made gluten-free treats and worked to help fill the bags. Pizza, brownies, macaroons, and even instant macaroni and cheese cuts, plus toddler fruit bags were included.

Sarah Leshay, Tewksbury resident and Girl Scout Baldwin Service Unit Manager, coordinated the gift component for children and families. Leshay and her own team of elves solicited donations and helped with shopping, reached out to friends, family and colleagues, and were able to cover any wishes with donated gifts or money.

Home visitors have provided a list of items that would be of the highest priority for children, which is passed on to donors, and Leshay and her team purchase and package the rest of the items. The donations were so generous that Leshay was also able to provide the agency with 12 grocery gift cards. The diapers were provided thanks to resident Tricia Langeleh.

A total of 94 children were served this year with gift bags including warm winter clothes, books and toys. Over 150 mum and dad bags were also generously donated by residents of Tewksbury and those in surrounding towns, each including gloves, hat, masks, hand sanitizer, cocoa and lip balm. Some extras also ended up in the bags such as candy, coffee gift cards, calendars, socks and blankets.

The knitters of the St. Williams Adult Choir made additional hats, as did Karen Cintolo of Tewksbury. Rose O’Neill and her friends made hand-crafted gift bags. Enthusiastic helpers from around Wilmington, North Andover and Groton, who have ties to Tewksbury, have also helped grow the network each year.

Bedford High School’s Special Education Program collected money for several gift bags, then their STEP students purchased the items and wrapped them up.

“They were so excited to participate,” said Leshay, herself a teacher at Bedford.

The Nashoba Learning Group and Amy Fong coordinated the wrapping of 50 gifts by their clients, which helps both the effort and the adult day program clients to have a meaningful and safe project, a tall order in the making. this period of COVID. Bedford High School’s STEP and SAIL program bought and wrapped gifts for a family, as did students from Mike Griffin and Patrick Morrissey’s Advisory.

Advisory students of Iffat Farooqui and Deb Darlington also wrapped more than 100 picture books for this effort. Girl Scout Junior Troop # 67431 and Daisy / Brownie Troop # 83441 from Tewksbury were huge helpers with the parents’ bags, according to Leshay. Together, they made 29 bags.

Leshay said, “There are so many ways for us to give back, be it through time, property or monetary donations. Our community and those around us have many opportunities if we just look.

If you want to be included in the effort next year, email Paige Impink at paige@yourtowncrier.com.


Source link

]]>
Writer shares funny stories aboard the bus https://hiocpely.com/writer-shares-funny-stories-aboard-the-bus/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/writer-shares-funny-stories-aboard-the-bus/ Provided / Content Christopher Candy is currently writing a series of children’s books based on his experiences in the bus industry. A writer from Manawatū uses his experience in the bus industry to tell children fun and positive stories about buses. Christopher Candy self-published Comet the red bus, a 24-page picture book for children ages […]]]>
Christopher Candy is currently writing a series of children's books based on his experiences in the bus industry.

Provided / Content

Christopher Candy is currently writing a series of children’s books based on his experiences in the bus industry.

A writer from Manawatū uses his experience in the bus industry to tell children fun and positive stories about buses.

Christopher Candy self-published Comet the red bus, a 24-page picture book for children ages two to eight, in 2021.

Candy said getting on buses for the first time, especially public buses, could be intimidating for kids, and he wanted to show how fun it could be.

“I want them to see the buses as a friendlier and more fun experience.”

READ MORE:
* Palmerston North’s first electric bus takes a ride
* Fifty years of sharing an abundance of books
* The Canterbury Children’s Participatory Author to get a story about bogies in print form

Comet the red bus was written by Candy and accompanied by bright and colorful images, illustrated by Samor Shikder.

Comet the red bus is fun to watch and carries many interesting characters around town while Billie, the driver, is friendly and helpful with the passengers, ”said Candy.

After driving buses for over 10 years, he was now Director of Operations at Tranzit Coachlines Manawatū.

He said he used that experience and what he saw in the industry to help him with ideas.

“Writing a children’s book was something I always wanted to do, but not necessarily something I thought I could do,” he said. “So, I thought I would write about something familiar to me. “

Since publication Comet the red bus he had received messages from bus drivers across the country with comments and ideas for future books.

“The feedback I got from booksellers is that they’ve never seen anything like it before, so I’m really looking forward to running with it. “

Following Comet the red bus, he had continued to write more books in the same vein and was looking to get his next book published in a professional manner.

Comet the red bus is available in softcover and hardcover and can be purchased online at www.christophercandy.co.nz.


Source link

]]>
New Jersey illustrator publishes books to help black girls https://hiocpely.com/new-jersey-illustrator-publishes-books-to-help-black-girls/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 00:59:54 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/new-jersey-illustrator-publishes-books-to-help-black-girls/ Author and illustrator Sharee Miller didn’t see a range of diverse characters in the books she read as a child, so she made her own as an adult. Greg Bledsoe and his Family Geography Project caught up with Miller in Jersey City, New Jersey, to talk about his journey and his popular children’s book “Princess […]]]>


Author and illustrator Sharee Miller didn’t see a range of diverse characters in the books she read as a child, so she made her own as an adult.

Greg Bledsoe and his Family Geography Project caught up with Miller in Jersey City, New Jersey, to talk about his journey and his popular children’s book “Princess Hair”.

“When I draw, I feel a sense of relief,” Miller said, noting that she gets lost in her imagination in the process.

“My mom loves telling me the story of when I was younger before I could even write, I would dictate stories to her and ask her to write them for me.”

She now writes her own inspirational tales for young black girls using watercolors, colored pencils and pens. Miller self-published his first book “Princess Hair” in 2014.

Sharee Miller via Instagram @coilyandcute

“I was inspired to write Princess hair after going through my own natural hair journey, ”Miller said in an interview with brilliantly.

“I stopped chemically straightening my hair and let it grow naturally. When I was growing up there weren’t a lot of depictions of girls and women with natural hair, and so I really had nothing to encourage myself to like what came naturally.

“As an adult, I finally saw images of women loving their natural hair and it inspired me to kiss my natural hair,” she said. “I wanted to go back in time and show myself how beautiful and versatile my hair is. I decided to do Princess hair for the next generation of girls baring their hair so that they feel empowered to love their hair.

“If we look back at how princesses have been portrayed in the past, they generally have the same characteristics – long, flowing hair and a lack of agency. Often times, princesses are portrayed not as characters but as items to be acquired or saved for a prince, but we are starting to break that archetype. Princesses are more diverse and more autonomous.

“Hair is an important part of this revolution because it represents more than diversity, it represents personality. The more individuality and personal style we can give to our characters, the more opportunities we give readers to identify with our characters, ”she said.

Miller told Bledsoe that “Princess Hair” is about teaching little black girls to love their hair.

“I haven’t really grown up enjoying my hair,” she says in the clip below. “The things I was drawing did not look like me. All of my main characters would be white.

Miller says it makes her sad to know that children today still struggle with similar identity issues that are often triggered by lack of media representation.

Princess hair is a celebration of our differences, ”she said.

According to Miller’s website, she is the author of numerous picture books, including “Don’t Touch My Hair” and “Michelle’s Garden,” published by Little Brown for young readers. She is also the illustrator for The Shai And Emmie Series, written by the actress. Quvenzhané Wallis and Nancy ohlin published by Simon and Schuster, and “The Excursion” published by Homebound Publications.

Miller is currently working on his first series of graphic novels “Curlfriends”.

Hear more from Miller in his interview below.

Have you subscribed to theGrio podcasts “Dear Culture” Where ” To act ? “ Download our latest episodes now!

TheGrio is now on Apple TV, Amazon Fire, and Roku. Download theGrio.com today!



Source link

]]>
Retirees open bookstore at Old Airport Road peddling center https://hiocpely.com/retirees-open-bookstore-at-old-airport-road-peddling-center/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/retirees-open-bookstore-at-old-airport-road-peddling-center/ SINGAPORE – On the second floor of the Old Airport Road hawking center, an unassuming little bookstore has popped up. Called Dakota Dreams, it sells children’s books and comics by Singaporean authors as well as pre-loved titles. Its neighbors are clothing stores and a Covid-19 rapid test center. Elderly residents stop to leaf through magazines; […]]]>

SINGAPORE – On the second floor of the Old Airport Road hawking center, an unassuming little bookstore has popped up.

Called Dakota Dreams, it sells children’s books and comics by Singaporean authors as well as pre-loved titles.

Its neighbors are clothing stores and a Covid-19 rapid test center. Elderly residents stop to leaf through magazines; children pull their grandparents to look at picture books on the shelves.

When it comes to bookstore locations, a hawking center may not seem like the obvious choice. But for the five founders of Dakota Dreams – all retired or semi-retired, several with a previous connection to the book industry – it makes sense.

“It’s unusual,” said retired Sng-Fun professor Poh Yoke, 68. “People are often surprised to see us here. But why not? Our motto has always been to reach out to ordinary people who maybe don’t even go to a mall, let alone a bookstore, but who do. at the market or hawking center. “

Dakota Dreams was first imagined when longtime Dakota resident Vienna Fong, 54, who volunteers with older people in the area, worried about the isolation of the elderly during the Covid-19.

She roped up her fellow Cantonese opera singer Chan Wai Han, 65, and Madame Sng-Fun, former artistic and bilingual editor of the Straits Times.

Ms. Chan’s husband Fong Hoe Fang, 67, retired founder of local publisher Ethos Books, and Mr. Richard Chong, 67, who worked in book printing and distribution, also joined. ours.

In October, they pooled their funds and bid on a locked unit at Old Airport Road, initially with the goal of giving single seniors in the area a place to relax. Then, given Mr. Fong’s editorial roots, the space began to fill with books.

Mr Fong estimates that there are currently around 20 to 30 titles in the store, from Constance Singam’s children’s book The Birds In The Bamboo Tree (2021) to Joshua Chiang Ronin Rat & Ninja Cat’s comedy miniseries ( 2019).

He sells new books for $ 9 to $ 12 and already loved books for $ 2 to $ 5. All proceeds will go towards rent and overhead of the space, which cost less than $ 1,000 per month. The five retirees take turns volunteering to run the store.

Books may be the main draw, they say, but people come for more than that. Seniors will stop to ask for help with their phones or for advice on whether something is a scam. Parents can leave their children at the store while they go shopping.

A Dakota resident, named Madame Chua, sits outside the store, browsing a cooking magazine. “I live with my son and when he is at work I am alone at home,” the 71-year-old man says in Mandarin. “It’s nice to have a place to go out to sit.”

Dakota Dreams also sells crafts and cards made by elderly people and plans to hold events such as storytelling sessions for children in the New Year, depending on the Covid-19 situation.


Source link

]]>
The Recorder – Standing and proud: an exhibition at the Eric Carle museum pays tribute to African Americans https://hiocpely.com/the-recorder-standing-and-proud-an-exhibition-at-the-eric-carle-museum-pays-tribute-to-african-americans/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 19:05:44 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/the-recorder-standing-and-proud-an-exhibition-at-the-eric-carle-museum-pays-tribute-to-african-americans/ It all started with a poem, an ode to African Americans and their courage and determination to build a meaningful life in a nation that has put the odds in their favor. Then it became an award-winning children’s book, “The Undefeated,” which combined Kwame Alexander’s words with Kadir Nelson’s paintings to tell this story of […]]]>

It all started with a poem, an ode to African Americans and their courage and determination to build a meaningful life in a nation that has put the odds in their favor.

Then it became an award-winning children’s book, “The Undefeated,” which combined Kwame Alexander’s words with Kadir Nelson’s paintings to tell this story of black resilience in a graphic format.

It is now an exhibition, a comprehensive presentation of Nelson’s original paintings that help celebrate the work of African American activists, artists, athletes and ordinary people who have made profound contributions to culture and to American history – ideally giving hope to the next generation of young black people.

“The Undefeated,” at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, features 16 large oil paintings from the 2019 book of the same name, which won three of the most distinguished children’s literature awards: a Caldecott Medal , the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award (for Nelson’s paintings) and a Newbery Honor (for Alexander’s text).

“The Undefeated” is the second comprehensive exhibition of Nelson’s work that Carle has mounted; the museum previously exhibited his paintings of famous black league baseball players. Nelson’s work has also been part of a number of group exhibitions at the museum in recent years.

Nelson’s current show runs through April 3.

Nelson is an acclaimed artist and author of children’s books in California whose work is featured in several museum collections and on U.S. commemorative stamps, and his work has also appeared on 16 covers of New Yorker magazine. He paints in a rich, atmospheric style reminiscent of the work of old European masters as well as iconic American artists such as Edward Hopper.

His portraits in “The Undefeated” also stand out because he almost all created them against plain white backgrounds. In these paintings we can see some of the most iconic African American figures in history: Martin Luther King, Jr., Jesse Owens, Frederick Douglass, Duke Ellington, Serena Williams, Muhammad Ali, Ella Fitzgerald.

But ordinary people are also a part of this tale, including a black family of five dressed in early 20th-century clothing, to whom Alexander’s poem pays homage as “Those Who Lived / America / by all means necessary. “

Courtney Waring, director of education at the Carle Museum, says she is particularly impressed with the way Nelson coupled her images with Alexander’s words to unveil a narrative that draws connections between past and present, references to trafficking Transatlantic from slaves in the civil rights era to the Black Lives Matter movement.

“The way these words and these paintings come together creates such a powerful story,” she said during a recent visit to the exhibition.

The painting on the front page of the book, for example, depicts Jesse Owens, the athletics star who won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, in the midst of his long jump victory at the Games. Alexander’s poem begins with the words “It’s for the unforgettable. / The fast and gentle / who hindered history / and opened up a world / possibilities.

Another painting commemorates the African Americans who fought on the Union side during the Civil War – the soldiers who as Alexander wrote in his poem “wore red, white and Tired blues / on the battlefield / to save an imperfect union.

While she enjoys all of Nelson’s work, Waring, a college art history major, says she is particularly drawn to a panel of mostly 20th-century African-American artists, including the sculptor. Augusta Savage, novelists Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes, and collagist Romare Bearden. The colorful backdrop, unlike the plain backgrounds of Nelson’s other paintings, is also a tribute to the style of Aaron Douglas, a renowned Harlem Renaissance painter.

“I really like the way [Nelson] added that touch here, ”Waring said.

Next to the paintings that celebrate people, there are those that recognize the victims of racism and segregation. Using a line from Alexander’s poem – “It’s for the unspeakable” – Nelson offers a picture of four young black girls who were killed in a bombing in Birmingham, Alabama during the 1970s. civil rights. The portraits of the four girls are shown in framed photographs with broken glass.

The only abstract image of Nelson in “The Undefeated” is a powerful one, made up of dozens and dozens of naked black bodies, lined up in tight rows like sardines, in reference to the transatlantic slave trade. By some estimates, well over 15% of those captured in Africa and brought to North and South America died en route due to the hellish conditions on the slave ships.

Ultimately, however, Alexander’s poem and Nelson’s paintings deliver a positive message. A painting, taken from the last two pages of the book, shows the faces of several smiling black children.

In an afterword to the book, Alexander, who is also a writer of children’s books, says he began writing his poem in 2008 in honor of his new daughter, Samayah, and Barack Obama after he was elected president. He wanted to tell the story that brought the country “to this historic moment,” he writes, and “to remind Samayah and his friends and family and all of you to remind me never to give up.”

For his part, Nelson added birds and butterflies to some of the paintings on the last pages of “The Undefeated”. As he said at a book awards ceremony last year, these aerial creatures function both as a “visual device” to further aid the story, but also to celebrate “the spirit. of the African American people, the spirit of excellence, resistance, beauty, pride, love and the universe.

“It’s one of the things I love the most [about the exhibit], the way it gives children hope that things can change, that there can be a better future, ”Waring said.

In addition to Nelson’s paintings, the Carle exhibition features some of the artist’s earliest drawings, including one of Mr. Spock, the character from the “Star Trek” series, at age 9, and another of the basketball legend. -ball Michael Jordan. There is also a reading area in the gallery with books illustrated by Nelson, as well as children’s books about many of the people featured in the paintings in the exhibition.

You can find more information about “The Undefeated” and the Eric Carle Museum at carlemuseum.org.

Steve Pfarrer can be reached at spfarrer@gazettenet.com.


Source link

]]>
Jonathan Spence, renowned researcher in China, dies at 85 https://hiocpely.com/jonathan-spence-renowned-researcher-in-china-dies-at-85/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 23:15:41 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/jonathan-spence-renowned-researcher-in-china-dies-at-85/ Jonathan D. Spence, an eminent scholar of China and its vast history who, in books like “God’s Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan” (1996) and “The Search for Modern China” (1990), unearthed the past and illuminated its present, died Saturday at his home in West Haven, Connecticut. He was 85 years old. […]]]>

Jonathan D. Spence, an eminent scholar of China and its vast history who, in books like “God’s Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan” (1996) and “The Search for Modern China” (1990), unearthed the past and illuminated its present, died Saturday at his home in West Haven, Connecticut. He was 85 years old.

His wife, Annping Chin, said the cause was complications from Parkinson’s disease.

Professor Spence, who taught for over 40 years at Yale University, where his classes were always in high demand, found the big picture of Chinese history in the small details. His deeply researched books examined individual lives and bizarre moments representative of larger cultural forces, wrapping it all in vivid storytelling.

“It’s a delicate spider’s web of a book, skillful, fascinating and precise like Chinese calligraphy,” Diana Preston wrote in the Los Angeles Times in a review of her “Betrayal by the Book” (2001), about a scholar who challenged the Third Manchurian Emperor in the early 1700s. “It’s also annoying because it conjures up so much that still resonates.”

Among Professor Spence’s most ambitious books was “The Research of Modern China,” which was on the New York Times bestseller list and is now standard text. It took an 876-page view of Chinese history, from the decline of the Ming Dynasty in the 1600s to the democratic movement of 1989.

“Other books have attempted to cover the political and social history of China from imperial times to communist times,” Vera Schwarcz wrote in her review of The Times. “But they lack the narrative technique, the richness of the illustrations and the thematic focus of this work.”

Professor Spence has written over a dozen books in all, beginning in 1966 with “Ts’ao Yin and the Emperor K’ang-hsi: Servant and Master”, based on his thesis on a minor historical figure in the late 1600s and early 1700s.

“There is no need to make big claims about the personal importance of Ts’ao Yin,” he wrote in the preface. “He was not one of the great officials of the Ch’ing dynasty, nor even a major figure of the K’ang-hsi reign. Rather, his importance lies in what the course of his life can tell us about the society in which he lived and the institutional framework in which he operated.

This approach would also guide much of Professor Spence’s later work. “Ts’ao Yin and Emperor K’ang-hsi,” said Pamela Kyle Crossley, Chinese scholar at Dartmouth College, by email, “have transformed the field, and its power as a new movement for storytelling in the world. he story echoed across many other specializations.

In “Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of K’ang-hsi” (1974), Professor Spence brought this emperor to life with an unusual technique.

“Jonathan gave us the monarch in his own words,” said Frederic E. Wakeman Jr., an East Asian scholar, in a speech in 2004 (reproduced in 2010 in Humanities magazine) when Professor Spence became president of the American Historical Association. “Kangxi spoke directly to the reader – or so it seemed. The book was controversial, as the Emperor’s speech was a collage of a myriad of sources in different contexts. But Kangxi’s voice was crisp and compelling, and the book moved beyond the confines of a conventional audience of Chinese scholars to reach a much larger audience.

Emily Hahn, reviewing this book in The Times, said: “Jonathan Spence punctured the translators balloon and let out all the gas.”

A number of other books by Professor Spence have also been released to the general public.

“In the 1970s and 1980s, he almost single-handedly made Chinese history a keen and immediate interest to the general public,” said Professor Crossley. “It’s unusual for a writer with this kind of popular impact to also be at the forefront of academic influence and credibility, but Jonathan was.”

Jonathan Dermot Spence was born on August 11, 1936 in Surrey, England, to Dermot and Muriel (Crailsham) Spence. Her father worked in a publishing house and an art gallery, and her mother was an avid student of all things French.

After graduating from Winchester College, a boys’ school, in 1954, he served two years in the military, stationed in Germany, then enrolled at Clare College, Cambridge. There he edited the campus newspaper and was co-editor of the literary magazine Granta.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1959, he went on to graduate school at Yale, where Chinese researcher Mary Wright fostered the interest that became his career. He received his doctorate in 1965 and began teaching at Yale the following year.

“For a generation of Yale undergraduates, ‘Spence’ was both a legend and a legendary course,” said Janet Y. Chen, a Yale graduate and now professor of history and history, via email. East Asian Studies at Princeton University. “With a single sheet of scribbled notes in his hand, he could keep an auditorium of 400 to 500 students captivated by attention. He seemed to be spinning gold out of thin air. I don’t think he ever gave the same talk twice.

His lectures at Yale became the heart of “The Research of Modern China”. Interest in this book was heightened by the fact that it was published shortly after the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989. Professor Spence’s long-term vision provided valuable context for these events.

“At a time when American interest in China is still strong,” Arnold R. Isaacs wrote in his book review for The Philadelphia Inquirer, “The Search for Modern China” persuades us that the key to understanding Tiananmen lies in China’s past, not in China’s past. in our own political myths.

Steve Forman of WW Norton, who was his editor on this book, and said a helping hand from someone close to Professor Spence was essential.

“There came a critical moment when he had already written the outstanding opening chapters but had not yet decided to embark on this massive project,” Forman said via email. “It was ultimately his mother whose enthusiasm for these chapters persuaded him to move on.”

“He ended up writing a good chunk of the book at a Naples Pizza table,” Mr. Forman added, naming a New Haven restaurant that is now closed, “where they then kept a framed photo of him on the wall. . “

Professor Spence’s first marriage, to Helen Alexander, ended in divorce. Besides his wife, whom he married in 1993, he is survived by a brother, Nicholas; two sons from his first marriage, Colin and Ian; a daughter-in-law, Mei Chin; one stepson, Yar Woo; a grandchild; and two step-grandchildren.

Another book by Spence which had both popular and scholarly appeal was “God’s Chinese Son” (1996), about Hong Xiuquan, who believed himself to be Jesus’ brother and led a calamitous pseudo-Christian movement in China. XIX century which caused a civil war in which millions of people died.

The parallels in history were obvious – China absorbed countless other outside influences, including communism and capitalism, and often gave them its own disastrous turn. But, as Orville Schell noted in a review of The Times, Professor Spence hasn’t hit his readers over the head with this point; as in most of his other books, he let the events speak for themselves.

“Mao Zedong used to extol the virtue of a ‘blank sheet of paper’ to write on,” Mr. Schell wrote. “Sir. Spence’s didactic reserve elicits the same response. The monstrosity of the events he recounts in ‘God’s Chinese Son’ makes us think for ourselves in search of a conclusion.”


Source link

]]>
Bilingual children’s book highlights local biodiversity with AR and animation https://hiocpely.com/bilingual-childrens-book-highlights-local-biodiversity-with-ar-and-animation/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 08:07:41 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/bilingual-childrens-book-highlights-local-biodiversity-with-ar-and-animation/ SINGAPORE – The hawksbill turtle – one of two turtle species native to Singapore – is one of eight marine animals to have a voice in a new bilingual children’s picture book aimed at highlighting local biodiversity and marine life. Entitled Pengembaraan Tim (Tim’s Adventure), the book is complemented by augmented reality (AR) functionality, a […]]]>

SINGAPORE – The hawksbill turtle – one of two turtle species native to Singapore – is one of eight marine animals to have a voice in a new bilingual children’s picture book aimed at highlighting local biodiversity and marine life.

Entitled Pengembaraan Tim (Tim’s Adventure), the book is complemented by augmented reality (AR) functionality, a short animated video, and a theme song for a more rewarding reading experience.

The story, aimed at preschoolers, follows the journey of a hawksbill turtle named Tim from the Nuns’ Islands and vice versa.

There is a marine turtle hatchery on Small Sister Island, a protected area zoned for conservation and research managed by the National Parks Board (NParks).

The book and various multimedia elements are created by brothers Rhaimie Wahap, 54, and Rizal Wahap, 47, with support from the Lee Kuan Yew Fund for Bilingualism.

Published in Malay and English, the children’s book was launched at an event at the Visual Arts Center on Friday, December 24, attended by National Development Minister Desmond Lee.

Mr. Lee, who wrote the preface to the book, also appears in the animated video to talk about conservation and biodiversity issues for young children.

“Singapore is a small island. But we have around 120 species of reef fish, over 200 species of sponges and 12 species of seagrass in our waters,” he said.

“I am pleased that this book is helping to educate our young readers about the importance of protecting our marine life in Singapore.”

Mr Rhaimie said he was inspired to write the book after realizing that there aren’t many local picture books for children that focus on the rich biodiversity and the efforts of Singapore conservation.

Mr. Rizal, a self-taught artist, has worked on illustrations, animation and AR elements. It took a year for the book and its various parts to come to fruition.

Mr Rhaimie said: “For a very long time, I was impressed with how sea turtles can find their way back to breeding. Initially, I wanted the story to take place in Terengganu, Malaysia, but my editor told me we had sea turtles laying eggs here on the beaches in Singapore. “

“We want to let young children know that we have a rich biodiversity here in Singapore and promote a love of nature,” he said, adding that he hopes the book will be the first in a long series. .

Mr. Rhaimie had composed a song Nama Saya Tim (My name is Tim) for the story which he hopes will be useful if children and educators perform a play based on the book.


Source link

]]>
YOU, YOUR CHILDREN AND YOUR SCHOOL: Be intentional when it comes to kindness | Education https://hiocpely.com/you-your-children-and-your-school-be-intentional-when-it-comes-to-kindness-education/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/you-your-children-and-your-school-be-intentional-when-it-comes-to-kindness-education/ The hustle and bustle of the holiday season is upon us, often leaving us in search of time with loved ones or the “perfect” gift. At West Elementary, our students recently started a unit in our social / emotional program, Second Step, on the power of kindness. Our students have learned that a kind act […]]]>

The hustle and bustle of the holiday season is upon us, often leaving us in search of time with loved ones or the “perfect” gift. At West Elementary, our students recently started a unit in our social / emotional program, Second Step, on the power of kindness.

Our students have learned that a kind act is being intentional with words and / or actions to do something kind for someone else. Together, we explored how others feel when they receive kindness and how sharing kindness makes us feel.

Teaching and practicing kindness takes place throughout the year in our building through the use of picture books, model acts of kindness, and class discussions. Being nice is also one of our school-wide “rules of being”. People who regularly practice kindness often seem happier, have better self-esteem, and have more meaningful relationships with their peers. They can also show a greater sense of appreciation for the people around them, as well as for the things they have.

Here are some easy ways to teach and / or share kindness with your family:

  • Use picture books to foster a discussion about what kindness can look, sound, and feel.
  • Create a daily family kindness challenge with simple ideas and check out at the end of the day how the act of kindness went.
  • Discuss the kinds of acts you and your child witnessed throughout the day and explore how this made the person feel.
  • Show your appreciation or thanks when kindness is shared with you.

As we begin this holiday season, we invite you and your families to join us at West Elementary School in being intentional with your time and gifts to show kindness to those around you. Remember that cuteness is a gift anyone can afford.

Jessica Bouta is a Certified School Counselor at West Elementary School. You, Your Kids & School is a bimonthly column of Hutchinson Public Schools.


Source link

]]>