Reading Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:54:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hiocpely.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hiocpely-icon.jpg Reading Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ 32 32 Research indicates that children’s books reinforce gender stereotypes. Here’s what to do about it. https://hiocpely.com/research-indicates-that-childrens-books-reinforce-gender-stereotypes-heres-what-to-do-about-it/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:54:17 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/research-indicates-that-childrens-books-reinforce-gender-stereotypes-heres-what-to-do-about-it/ Reading aloud is one of the best things parents can do for their young children: teach them about the world and themselves, and even change the structure of their brains. But a new study is a stark reminder that the “what” and the “how” matter. When researchers analyzed 247 books for children up to age […]]]>

Reading aloud is one of the best things parents can do for their young children: teach them about the world and themselves, and even change the structure of their brains.

But a new study is a stark reminder that the “what” and the “how” matter. When researchers analyzed 247 books for children up to age 5 (including a mix of bestsellers and titles from “best of all time” lists), they found evidence of numerous gender stereotypes― for example, girls are better at language and boys are better at math.

Many stories also use gendered language and concepts. When girls are the protagonists, books are more likely to use words that convey affection or contain words like “explain” and “listen.” When boys are the protagonists, plots and language tend to focus more on labor, transportation, and tools.

“There is often a sort of cycle of learning gender stereotypes, with children learning stereotypes at a young age and then perpetuating them as they get older,” studies researcher Molly Lewis, a professor specializing in the departments of social and decision-making sciences and of psychology at Dietrich. College of Humanities and Social Sciences, said in a press release. “These books can be a vehicle for communicating information about gender. We may need to pay attention to what those messages might be and if they are messages that you even want to convey to children.

Lewis stressed that she and her co-researchers were not looking to destroy the families’ relationships with, say, Amelia Bedelia or Curious George. But the are simple steps caregivers can take to tackle sexist language and stereotypes in picture books. Here are a few.

Take a critical look at your child’s library

One of the best ways parents can offer a counterbalance to gender stereotypes in children’s books – and this applies to stereotypes of all kinds, really – is to ensure that children have access to books that are not sexist at home and in the library. The internet is full of lists of representative titles of children’s books, many of which center on LGBTQ characters. There are book finders and collections that can also help you.

In some gender-neutral books, a character’s gender or sexuality is central to the plot; other times it is not. These so-called “every child” books can also be powerful. The goal is to have a mix.

“This Is it that it doesn’t matter what books you read,” Jennifer Goldstein, book manager at A Kids Book About, told HuffPost. “Seeing a strong portrayal of someone like you in a proactive and positive role is a building block of your future self.”

Also, make sure you don’t just read books with male leads for boys and books with female leads for girls. The researchers behind the new study found that children are most often exposed to stereotypes about their own gender, suggesting parents don’t necessarily mix them up.

“It is important for all of us to see all kinds of people doing everyday and important things. This means all genders are visible, including cisgender, transgender and non-binary,” Goldstein said. “Reflect the news of humanity as a whole. It’s a lifelong skill and opens up the idea that we can all do anything.

Use questionable books as tools

Chances are your child will love a book or two that isn’t really open-minded about gender roles. But you don’t have to throw away books like these. Instead, use them. Books can be a great way to tackle important and tricky topics, especially for young children whose brains are developing millions of neural connections per second.

“Every children’s book is a moment of fun and a moment of education,” said Diane Ehrensaft, director of the Mental Health, Child and Adolescent Gender Center at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Francisco.

They are not too young. The American Academy of Pediatrics points out that children learn a lot about what they think gender role behaviors are and what they “should” be, early on – like, at age 4. year.

So just notice the basic stereotypes and point them out.

“You can say something like, ‘I’m looking at this and wondering why Sylvia always has to wear pink? And why can’t Jeremy wear pink? said Ehrensaft. “You can just say, ‘I wonder why should that be? And why shouldn’t it be a popular color? »

Goldstein offered other questions that can help start discussions:

  • “Do you think your sex is important to be a doctor? A chef? Driving racing cars? Sew clothes? Why?”

  • “At school, does your gender help you learn the alphabet? Count to 10? Use a pencil? Read a book? Why?”

  • “With us, who does what? Why?”

Take out the post-its

Another option: turn it into a hands-on activity and use post-its so you and your child can rewrite the book together. If there’s something you’d like to emphasize or push back — like the same simple example of all the female characters in a book wearing pink, while all the boys are wearing blue — stick the Post-it note in the book. Maybe write a thought bubble in which a male character says, “Damn, I wish I was wearing pink sometimes.

“It’s a creative activity with your child, so you don’t have to put those books away. You can use them and modify them,” Ehrensaft said. Plus, it’s fun for kids to play author. And it gives them a sense of agency, Ehrensaft noted.

Of course, not every book has to be a teachable moment. None of the experts interviewed for this article argued that this was the case. Sometimes you and your toddler or preschooler are just going to want to cuddle up before bed and get lost in a story without caring about the most important message. Do not force.

“You should never make a child read what you believe,” Ehrensaft said. You also shouldn’t lecture or argue with them if they have moments where they say yes, pink most definitely is the color of a girl. They are small and they are learning. Parents are also still learning.

“It’s a conversation starter,” Ehrensaft said.

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Jacqueline Fernandez takes the spiritual route, reading books on “forgiveness and healing” amid intimate viral images with Sukesh Chandrashekhar? https://hiocpely.com/jacqueline-fernandez-takes-the-spiritual-route-reading-books-on-forgiveness-and-healing-amid-intimate-viral-images-with-sukesh-chandrashekhar/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:48:50 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/jacqueline-fernandez-takes-the-spiritual-route-reading-books-on-forgiveness-and-healing-amid-intimate-viral-images-with-sukesh-chandrashekhar/ Jacqueline Fernandez embarks on spirituality amid a leak of intimate photos with Sukesh Chandrashekhar? (Photo credit – Instagram; Youtube) Jacqueline Fernandez has been fighting ever since her name appeared in a 200 crore money laundering case. Conman Sukesh Chandrashekhar even claimed he was in a relationship with the Kick actress. In the midst of it […]]]>
Jacqueline Fernandez embarks on spirituality amid a leak of intimate photos with Sukesh Chandrashekhar? (Photo credit – Instagram; Youtube)

Jacqueline Fernandez has been fighting ever since her name appeared in a 200 crore money laundering case. Conman Sukesh Chandrashekhar even claimed he was in a relationship with the Kick actress. In the midst of it all, intimate photos of the alleged couple went viral and it was really difficult. Because of all this, does beauty choose the spiritual path?

It wasn’t until last week that a romantic photo of Jacqueline and Sukesh went viral. You could even notice a love bite on her neck. The actress issues a public statement and asks the media to respect her privacy. She also mentioned having gone through a “difficult patch”.

According to an India Today report, Jacqueline Fernandez is now practicing spirituality to keep her in the difficult phase. “Jacqueline has always had a spiritual inclination. She believes in affirmations and journaling. She’s been doing it for quite a while now. The actress also does a lot of meditation and breathing exercises. She is going through a difficult period. And she also reads a lot of Louise L Hay’s books, which are about forgiveness and healing, ”said a source close to the development.

But not, Jacqueline Fernandez, even Nora Fatehi was involved in the same case. Sukesh Chandrashekhar is said to have given the actress very expensive gifts. From Jackky’s Persian cats to Nora’s car, all of these gifts have been under the ED radar.

It is also said that Nora Fatehi became a witness in the case and coordinated with those responsible for the case.

We hope that Jacqueline Fernandez and Nora Fatehi will get out of trouble as soon as possible!

Stay tuned to Koimoi for more Bollywood updates.

Must read: Sacred Games Fame Jatin Sarna reveals he rejects Tiger 3, Bachchan Pandey and other Biggies: “I don’t like the roles of Dost, Chacha and Bhateja anymore”

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five essential books on the American painter https://hiocpely.com/five-essential-books-on-the-american-painter/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 13:45:41 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/five-essential-books-on-the-american-painter/ “O’Keeffe tasted exquisite and delicious, and I can see why she became a fashion icon during her lifetime.” • Click here for more playlists from the world’s greatest artists On the death of American artist Georgia O’Keeffe in 1986, at the age of 98, she was celebrated by the New York Times as the “undisputed […]]]>

“O’Keeffe tasted exquisite and delicious, and I can see why she became a fashion icon during her lifetime.”

• Click here for more playlists from the world’s greatest artists

On the death of American artist Georgia O’Keeffe in 1986, at the age of 98, she was celebrated by the New York Times as the “undisputed dean of American painting”. Although famous for her flower paintings, she has also lived and painted some of the country’s most iconic landscapes, from the skyscrapers of New York to the deserts of New Mexico.

A major exhibition of O’Keeffe’s work opens this month at the Fondation Beyeler near Basel and the museum’s chief curator, Theodora Vischer, has selected five books that bear witness to her varied career.

Georgia O’Keeffe: a life (1989) by Roxana Robinson

Georgia O’Keeffe: a life (1989) by Roxana Robinson

“Roxana Robinson’s Full Biography is a vivid account of O’Keeffe’s remarkable artistic career. Robinson recounts in detail the artist’s long life, which, although most often associated with the American Southwest, spanned many different locations across the United States.

Georgia O’Keeffe: living in modernity (2017) by Wanda M. Corn

Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern (2017) by Wanda M. Corn

“The art and lifestyle of O’Keeffe was shaped by a modernist aesthetic. This is reflected in her wardrobe, as well as in the design and furnishings of her two homes in New Mexico. Wanda Corn has sought this decisive unity between art and life and presents her findings in this brilliant and richly illustrated catalog.

My Faraway One: Selected Letters of Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Vol. 1, 1915-1933 (2011) by Sarah Greenough

My Faraway One: Selected Letters of Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Vol. 1, 1915-1933 (2011) by Sarah Greenough

“O’Keeffe was a prolific writer and her extensive correspondence with Alfred Stieglitz offers an intimate glimpse into her relationship with the photographer who was her greatest supporter and later became her husband. The letters testify to the deep bond between the two, as they inspired each other.

Letters from Georgia O’Keeffe during the Texas War (2020) by Amy von Lintel

Letters from Georgia O’Keeffe during the Texas War (2020) by Amy von Lintel

“This book features O’Keeffe’s letters written over two years while working as an art teacher in Canyon, Texas. Most of them are directed to Stieglitz and come with some excellent commentary. In this entertaining read, I met a dynamic young woman discovering her voice, participating in everything that is going on [around her]. “

A painter’s kitchen. Recipes from Georgia O’Keeffe’s Kitchen, New Edition (2009) by Margaret Wood

A painter’s kitchen. Recipes from Georgia O’Keeffe’s Kitchen, New Edition (2009) by Margaret Wood

“When O’Keeffe moved to New Mexico, she grew a vegetable garden at her house. I’ve come across several cookbooks devoted to cooking O’Keeffe, but this recently re-edited book, written by his personal chef, is the most authentic. The recipes, based on locally grown or locally grown foods, are simple, flavorful, and look great when served. “

Georgia o’keeffe, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 23 January-22 May

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The story of a lesbian baby boomer https://hiocpely.com/the-story-of-a-lesbian-baby-boomer/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 15:21:30 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/the-story-of-a-lesbian-baby-boomer/ There is still a lot of winter left. It is the fact that is staring you in the face. Once the holiday decorations are down, the toys put away, and you’ve rediscovered your gift certificates, what do you do with them? You buy books, of course. And to get you started, here are some surefire […]]]>

There is still a lot of winter left.

It is the fact that is staring you in the face. Once the holiday decorations are down, the toys put away, and you’ve rediscovered your gift certificates, what do you do with them?

You buy books, of course. And to get you started, here are some surefire picks for the best of 2021:

FICTION

What would you do if life threw a curve ball at you? In “The Guncle” by Steven Rowley (Putnam, $ 27.00), Gay, Former TV Star, Palm Springs Regular, No Responsibilities Patrick is asked to care for his long-term niece and nephew. He never wanted children at all. He never wanted to fall in love with them either. Cute, sweet, funny, genuine – what more could you ask for?

You don’t have to have read Cork O’Conner’s other novels to want “Thunderbolt” by William Kent Krueger (Atria, $ 27.00), which brings readers back to 1963, and a murder in a small town in Minnesota. Cork O’Conner is then a young teenager, the son of the local sheriff, and he knows that Big John Manydeeds could not have hanged himself. But how does a boy go about proving something like this? For the fans, this is a question one should not miss. For new fans, this will send you running to the rest of the Cork O’Conner series.

Watchers of “The Handmaiden’s Tale” will absolutely devour “Outlaw” by Anna North (Bloomsbury, $ 26.00). In a small corner of Texas, at an unspecified time, 17-year-old Ada struggles to give birth to her husband, which embarrasses her, and it’s something only witches do. This is how Ada is driven out of the community and heads north, to a place of safety, where barren women are outlawed. This dystopian and feminist western is dangerous and delicious.

“Raft of stars” by Andrew J. Graff (Ecco, $ 26.99) is a coming-of-age story of two boys who are best friends, and one of them is abused by his father. Tired of seeing his friend injured, the other boy shoots the man and the two boys run away to escape what will surely be legal issues and possibly even jail time. They run to a lie, however, and they head for a waterfall that they don’t know is there. This is one of those books with heartbreakingly beautiful prose in a story that will leave your hands sweaty.

And finally, have you ever wondered what your life would be like if you had taken a different path? In “The nine lives of Rose Napolitano “ by Donna Freitas (Pamela Dorman Books, $ 26.00), a woman has many options in her life, each ending in a way she never thought possible. It’s like “Groundhog Day” with a twist that will roll around in your mind for days …

NON-FICTION

For every child who grew up with a stack of comics next to the bed, in a drawer, or in the closet, “American comics: a story” by Jeremy Dauber (WW Norton, $ 35) is a must-see. Here, Dauber follows the comics from their political roots to militant cartoons today, and how we went from Katzenjammer Kids to MAD Magazine to compose as we know them. The bonus is that Dauber puts the comics in a fascinating historical perspective.

Did you buy your lottery ticket this week? If you did, it will make a good bookmark for “Jackpot: How the super-rich really live – and how their wealth harms us all” by Michael Mechanic (Simon & Schuster, $ 28.00). You might think twice about the burden of wealth after reading this book – and you might reconsider your thoughts on what one person’s wealth does to everyone.

Readers who love memoirs will appreciate “Punch Me Up to the Gods” by Brian Broome (HMH, $ 26), who writes about growing up, being in love with the boy who abused him and the father who did too. It’s a sometimes funny and always graceful coming-out story that will sometimes make you gasp and be happy to read.

Do you know that feeling you get when you stumble upon a stack of old magazines in the attic? That sweet hometown feeling of yesteryear is extra rich inside “The ride of his life” by Elizabeth Letts (Ballantine, $ 28). It is the story of Annie Wilkins, aging, ill and alone, and the daring cross-country race that she decides to undertake on a horse she has just bought. This wellness story takes place in the 1950s and its neighborhood could make it the perfect antidote for today’s world.

Recently, “The Redemption of Bobby Love” by Bobby and Cheryl Love with Lori L. Tharps (Mariner Books / HMH Books, $ 28) might be the most unusual memoir you’ve read this winter. As a young man, Walter Miller escaped from a prison bus and traveled to New York City, where he renamed himself Bobby Love and hid in plain sight. Love kept the straight path, fell in love, got married and raised a family, but 40 years later the law caught up with it. This incredible and impossible story, told alternately between the two loves, is one that you, uh, will love.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Based on a real event (the Mexican Revolution), “The Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna” by Alda P. Dobbs (Sourcebooks, $ 17.99) tells the story of a young girl who becomes responsible for her Abuelita and her little sister when the Federales destroy their village and their home. This causes the trio to run north, one step ahead of those who wish to kill them, in a race to reach the border and get to America. It is fascinating read for 8 to 14 year olds.

Children who like silly stories will appreciate “The egg marks the spot: a story of a skunk and a badger” by Amy Timberlake, the second in what appears to be a series. A whirlwind named Skunk and his very posed and very reluctant friend Badger are at odds again – this time over a missing stone from Badger’s collection. There are chickens involved, a little mysterious, dinosaurs and lots of fun for your 7-10 year old. Hint: find the first Skunk and Badger book; your child will want this one too.

For teens who love unique memories, “Violet and Daisy: the story of the famous Siamese twins of Vaudeville” by Sarah Miller (Schwartz & Wade, $ 17.99) is the story of the Hilton sisters, their careers and their lives. Born united at the bottom of the spine, Violet & Daisy were “adopted” by a woman who led their lives. Upon her death, the daughters were passed on to this woman’s heirs, who mismanaged their careers and left them almost penniless. It’s an exciting story of Legalities, Vaudeville, and two women determined to make their own way, despite having been united forever. It’s the perfect read for any reader ages 14 and up, including memoir-loving adults.

So now go to the bookstore. Hunting at the library. Don’t miss these excellent books for adults and children – and Readings of the season!


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Book review: “In paradise”, by Hanya Yanagihara https://hiocpely.com/book-review-in-paradise-by-hanya-yanagihara/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:00:10 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/book-review-in-paradise-by-hanya-yanagihara/ IN PARADISEBy Hanya Yanagihara Can an Asian American Woman Write a Great American Novel? Should a great American novel go from New York to Hawaii, skipping the Midwest? Can he go from realism to dystopia? And – most important of all, perhaps – can he focus on gay men? It is to Hanya Yanagihara’s credit […]]]>

IN PARADISE
By Hanya Yanagihara

Can an Asian American Woman Write a Great American Novel? Should a great American novel go from New York to Hawaii, skipping the Midwest? Can he go from realism to dystopia? And – most important of all, perhaps – can he focus on gay men?

It is to Hanya Yanagihara’s credit that her new novel raises these questions. At over 700 pages, with a duration of 200 years, “To Paradise” begins in New York in 1893. We are given a patriarch, wealth, children; there is an arranged marriage, an inheritance, true love, a class divide, and a significant twist. Skilfully paced and judiciously detailed, the tale is authentic with the conventions of the nineteenth century novel. But that’s not all. With breathtaking audacity, Yanagihara rewrites America, the Civil War having produced, in this narrative, not a united country but a conglomerate of territories, including one called the Free States. In this nation within the nation, same-sex marriage is allowed – although, to qualify the picture, arranged marriages are also allowed.

Yanagihara continues to rewrite history in other centuries as well, even as she moves the action from New York to Hawaii and back again, negotiates three major and nine minor time lags, and, most strikingly, brings her characters out. the stage to bring them back, to other times and in other forms, again and again. To give just one of many examples, David Bingham, the heir to a mansion in Part I, returns a century later as a legal assistant, passionately in love with a certain Charles Griffith. (We’ve met Charles before, as an older, unruffled suitor who was rejected by the Part I David Bingham. Now he’s an even older but dashing and worldly partner in David’s cabinet; David, in addition, once fair complexion, is now mixed.)

There are dozens of other reincarnations of this type, and they are both dazzling and disconcerting. If, in a Russian novel, it is difficult to know who is linked to whom, here we have difficulty in knowing who has become who, especially since Yanagihara also masterfully reuses themes, situations and motifs. It is not just arranged marriages and class differences that recur. Pandemics, mansions, triangles, diseases, abandonments, deaths, letters and heirlooms also reappear kaleidoscopically, as do grandfathers, lovers, invalids, guardians, utopians and more. .


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Where do bestselling authors want you to buy their books from? https://hiocpely.com/where-do-bestselling-authors-want-you-to-buy-their-books-from/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:00:02 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/where-do-bestselling-authors-want-you-to-buy-their-books-from/ SHOP LOCAL Amor Towles The third novel, “The Lincoln Highway,” is at No. 4 in its 13th week on the hardcover fiction list. Here’s a small but notable fact about former Wall Streeter turned full-time writer: He’s one of the few best-selling authors whose website sends potential readers to buy books from Indiebound before Amazon. […]]]>

SHOP LOCAL Amor Towles The third novel, “The Lincoln Highway,” is at No. 4 in its 13th week on the hardcover fiction list. Here’s a small but notable fact about former Wall Streeter turned full-time writer: He’s one of the few best-selling authors whose website sends potential readers to buy books from Indiebound before Amazon. If you’re a publishing geek like me, you’ll notice how many popular writers say they’re grateful to independent bookstores for the success of their novels, memoirs, thrillers, picture books, and self-help guides – but skip to their pages and you’ll find purchase links that will take you straight to Jeff Bezos’ All store (don’t walk past a neatly organized front window, hear the bells ringing as you walk through the front door, do not pick up a bookmark near the cash register). Yes, ordering your next reading with your paper towels is easy with one click; yes, if you present the buy buttons in alphabetical order, Amazon will arrive at the top of the list. But if you’re an author, like Towles, who claims to appreciate local bookstores for “hand-selling” your work, why not direct your readers directly to Indiebound, which helps keep those stores light? John Grisham, Mitch Albom, Nicholas Sparks and Diana Gabaldon, I’m looking at you.

ENVIRONMENT Good luck finding an author’s website where you can purchase Stacey Abrams’ debut picture book, which makes the list this week at # 1; you’re more likely to land on a page where you can donate to the Georgia Democratic governor’s campaign. Abrams is certainly not the first political insider to come into contact with readers on the ground floor: former President Barack Obama, Vice President Kamala Harris, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Governor Gavin Newsom and the Former Second Lady Karen Pence have all published picture books of their own, covering patriotism, feminism, a bird’s eye view of the capital, superheroes and dyslexia. Once you get your hands on “Stacey’s Extraordinary Words,” exuberantly illustrated by Kitt Thomas, you can expect a solidly bipartisan reading experience. The story is a celebration of language, told through the eyes of a girl who is invited to participate in a spelling contest. “Stacey loved words,” writes Abrams. “She loved funny words, long words, unusual words. Words with wonderful stories and strange combinations. Every time Stacey learned a new word, it was like making a new friend. Who is with her?


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Books to read in the snow – Rochester Minnesota news, weather, sports https://hiocpely.com/books-to-read-in-the-snow-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:02:46 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/books-to-read-in-the-snow-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ “Canoe Country” by Florence Page Jaques; illustrated by Francis Lee Jaques; originally published in 1938, republished in December 2021 “Snowshoe Country” by Florence Page Jaques; illustrated by Francis Lee Jaques; originally published in 1944, republished in December 2021 “Canoe Country” and “Snowshoe Country” were reprinted and published in December 2021 – more than three-quarters of […]]]>

“Canoe Country” by Florence Page Jaques; illustrated by Francis Lee Jaques; originally published in 1938, republished in December 2021

“Snowshoe Country” by Florence Page Jaques; illustrated by Francis Lee Jaques; originally published in 1944, republished in December 2021

“Canoe Country” and “Snowshoe Country” were reprinted and published in December 2021 – more than three-quarters of a century after their initial publication. Both are written by Florence with illustrations by Francis. These actual stories are compiled like a diary – written from Florence’s first-person perspective. Canoe Country has entries that start with their planning in February and the start of their trip in August until the end of their trip in September. “Snowshoe Country” begins with entries in October and ends in January. They are both tributes to one of Minnesota’s greatest treasures.

“Canoe Country”

Contribution / Press of the University of Minnesota

Reading ‘Canoe Country’ you see Florence falling in love with the scenery and the magic of Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) even before it was established as BWCAW.

“Snowshoe Country” shows a real take on winter life in the BWCAW. The descriptions of Florence are fascinating. It introduces readers to the people who inhabit this region year round in the 1930s and 1940s. It provides valuable insight into the survival requirements for this special area. Readers may also encounter a variety of creatures, some majestic and others very adorable.

Almost all other pages contain a pen and ink illustration of Francis. Some are portraits of a single creature and others are perfect perspective landscapes with rippling water and textured rocks. They add great visuals to both books.

As this is a reprint of books written in the 1930s and 1940s, some references and languages ​​are not appropriate today. The publisher has chosen to keep this language in its original form by paying tribute to its literary heritage. This is less of a problem for me than the other books I’ve written about. Indeed, the target audience for these books are adults and not children who will most likely understand the time when these words were written and the meaning intended by the author. However, I do not glance at these words lightly or consider them acceptable uses today.

“Canoe Country” and “Snowshoe Country” teaches something about the value of all life and the beautiful in the simple. These books made me enthusiastically plan my first canoe trip to the area for (hopefully) this summer – something I think every Minnesotan should experience.

Snowshoe country.jfif

“Snowshoe country”

Contribution / Press of the University of Minnesota

Florence Page Jaques was born in New York in 1890. She was a poet and nature writer and collaborated with her husband on eight books. She died in 1972.

Francis Lee Jaques was born in 1887 and spent his childhood in Aitkin, Minn. His art of nature and wildlife is internationally renowned and is in the collections of the Bell Museum at the University of Minnesota and the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He died in 1969.

“Canoe Country” and “Snowshoe Country” are both available online from the University of Minnesota Press (

www.upress.umn.edu

), Amazon, Barnes and Noble. Previous prints are available in person at the Rochester Public Library.

Winter blanket for children.jfif

“The children of winter: a celebration of Nordic skiing”

Contribution / Press of the University of Minnesota

“Winter Kids: A Celebration of Nordic Skiing” by Ryan Rodgers; published on December 14, 2021 by University of Minnesota Press

“Winter’s Children” is filled with (almost) everything one could want to know about Nordic skiing and its Minnesota heritage. It contains a lot of details about who turned a pair of skis into a competitive sport and made it more than a tool for everyday life.

This book is packed with details ranging from changes in ski design to the rise and fall in popularity of skiing. It contains the evolving expectations and changing roles of women in skiing, the flourishing of skiing after WWII, and the successes and reinventions of the sport.

There are photographs and illustrations on almost every page and Rodgers shares his vast skiing experience to make this book very comprehensive.

This is a great read for sports fans, avid skiers, or Minnesotans interested in this culturally rich sport. As a Minnesotan, born and raised, I might have to give skiing another chance after reading it.

Ryan Rodgers is an avid skier and freelance writer whose work has appeared in “Backpacker” and “The Sun”, among many other magazines. He has served as Chairman of the Board of the Standing Cedars Community Land Conservancy and lives with his family in northern Minnesota.

“Winter’s Children” is available online at University of Minnesota Press, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble. It is available in person at the Rochester Public Library.

Book Nook is a feature that highlights books by Minnesota authors. Got a recommendation? Email us at life@postbulletin.com with the subject line “Book Nook”.


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The best books of 2022 to add to your reading list https://hiocpely.com/the-best-books-of-2022-to-add-to-your-reading-list/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:11:28 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/the-best-books-of-2022-to-add-to-your-reading-list/ It will be a year of spectacular books. The best books of 2022, that is, the most anticipated new books of the coming year, are amazing. There are non-fiction books and novels about cults, female friendships, family ties, and future civilizations. Books that will make you laugh until the mascara runs down your face. Scary […]]]>

It will be a year of spectacular books. The best books of 2022, that is, the most anticipated new books of the coming year, are amazing. There are non-fiction books and novels about cults, female friendships, family ties, and future civilizations. Books that will make you laugh until the mascara runs down your face. Scary thrillers and gripping memories. Romantic books that will make you download dating apps again. There is no reason to ask, “Which book should I read?” For a full year.

Pull out your card – whether it’s a Visa card or a good old-fashioned library card – and get ready to pre-order or get on waiting lists for these new 2022 books. who should be Amazon’s best sellers. Do what you can to get your hands on these glossy hardback covers, their glossy covers are begging to transform a built-in shelf or tuck away in a tote bag. Go ahead, spam your reading group text with arguments as to why your novels to read this year should include literary fiction about an octopus (Remarkably brilliant creatures, May) or a novel about obsessive female friendship set in the early 2000s in Berlin (Other people’s clothing, February) or the book about a mixed race vampire who keeps looking mukbang videos (woman eating April.)

Get excited: 2022 book releases are coming. These are Charmthe most anticipated books to read in the coming year.

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Chinese bookstore boom fueled by visual appeal and social media traffic https://hiocpely.com/chinese-bookstore-boom-fueled-by-visual-appeal-and-social-media-traffic/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 04:51:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/chinese-bookstore-boom-fueled-by-visual-appeal-and-social-media-traffic/ Visitors take photos and read books in Shenzhen on November 13, 2021, at Zhongshuge bookstore, a famous interior design chain. VCG | China Visual Group | Getty Images BEIJING – Social media plays such an important role for Chinese consumer companies that for a multitude of new bookstores, visual appeal tends to be a priority. […]]]>

Visitors take photos and read books in Shenzhen on November 13, 2021, at Zhongshuge bookstore, a famous interior design chain.

VCG | China Visual Group | Getty Images

BEIJING – Social media plays such an important role for Chinese consumer companies that for a multitude of new bookstores, visual appeal tends to be a priority.

The elaborate interior fittings – sometimes amplified by mirrors – have not only caught the attention of “Architectural Digest” but also young Chinese in search of new experiences.

“The Chinese consumer, especially after the 1990s [generation], they want convenience, they want novelty, ”said Derek Deng, partner of Shanghai-based Bain & Co., who leads the company’s consumer products practice in Greater China.

“They want the products [that] not only meeting their functional needs, but also meeting their emotional needs, “he said,” whether it’s something you can show your peers, something you always find fun , or something you just feel like you need to blend in more easily. “

Shopping centers have noticed it. Rather than signing deals with department stores to make them their main draw for customers, malls turned to cafes and tea rooms, finely-designed bookstores, electric car showrooms and shops. ‘other trendy stores, said Jacky Zhu, West China research manager at JLL.

“They can generate foot traffic. They can generate foot traffic for a targeted customer,” he said. This is so much the case, he added, that malls will let bookstores pay a third or a quarter of the rent for a clothing or cosmetics store.

In addition to visually appealing interiors, many bookstores in China sell coffee, stationery, and gifts. Nostalgia for China for the past decades is a popular theme.

One of Mia Huang’s favorite bookstores is a boutique in a traditional Beijing courtyard with four walls. The store displays many historical items such as bicycles and door signs, and has a public reading area, she said.

Huang, who is a post-90 generation, said she quit her job at an internet technology company in 2019 to become a full-time travel blogger – sharing comments, photos and videos on her experiences.

This building in Beijing, China was built in 1907 as the city’s first Anglican church, but lost its religious functions a long time ago and was turned into a bookstore before this photo was taken on June 21, 2019 .

Fan of Jason | Barcroft Media | Getty Images

Another of Huang’s favorite bookstores is one converted from a church building in Beijing.

“A lot of people go out there to ‘check in’,” she said in Mandarin, referring to a trend where people visit places they’ve seen on social media and then pick up their tickets. own photos to prove they went.

Going to bookstores isn’t really for buying books, she said, noting that many stores have become tourist attractions or cozy places to take a break.

Some bookstores in China have become so popular that thousands of people are ready to hike in remote areas, according to a 2019 report from the state-affiliated online publication Sixth Tone. A village location of trendy Librairie Avant-Garde bookstore grossed 1.5 million yuan ($ 234,375) in revenue for the year through mid-November, according to a China Daily state newspaper report.

Learn more about China from CNBC Pro

It is less clear whether the renewed interest in visually appealing bookstores means that businesses are actually profiting from the sale of books.

Store title selections are often concentrated in art and design, while non-book gift items can take up a significant portion of floor space, this reporter observed.

In China, strict government control means that titles published or sold in the country must not face censorship. Many bookstore entries prominently display books by or about Chinese President Xi Jinping, while the state operates its own nationwide bookstore chain.

Locals read books at the Xinhua Bookstore in Handan, Hebei Province, China, June 13, 2021.

Costphoto | Barcroft Media | Getty Images

Businesses that call themselves bookstores have continued to open.

More than 40,000 new bookstore-related businesses have registered in the country each year since 2017, according to Qichacha, a business database. For this year through November, 39,000 new bookstore businesses have registered – a 6% year-over-year increase, according to the data.

Those openings still exceed the annual closings of about 10,000 or more bookstore-related businesses, the database showed.

A model walks the runway for Chinese designer Wang Dongyang’s LEDIN collection runway during Chinese Fashion Week 2020/2021 A / W Collection at Page One Bookstore on May 6, 2020 in Beijing, China.

Sheng Jiapeng | China Information Service | Getty Images

However, bookstores have never been an easy business in the digital age, and the financial woes of leading bookstore chain Yanyouji this fall have generated an online discussion on the future of photogenic bookstores. It reflects the difficulties of running a business even after it has gained traction on social media, and is emblematic of a trend in China’s rapidly growing consumer market.

Of the 46 Chinese consumer brands that emerged in 2018, only 17 are still doing well this year, analysts at Bain and Kantar Worldpanel found in a report released this month. In makeup, 30% of brands that entered the market in 2016 have been discontinued, according to the report.

New Chinese mainstream brands in recent years have tended to use online e-commerce channels and social media to get a first wave of traffic, Deng said. He noted that digital data on consumer trends helps new brands test and adapt their products quickly.

A look inside TSUTAYA Bookstore on March 29, 2021, Xi’an City, Shaanxi Province, China.

Costphoto | Barcroft Media | Getty Images

But it’s harder for these newcomers to find a second channel for growth, which typically requires expansion into the more complicated world of physical stores and local distribution, Deng said.

“What has always been lacking is that once you recruit [consumers] once you’ve got them to buy your product for the first time, how can you make sure they continue with you? ”he said.“ Repeat buy rate has become one of the most important factors for these insurgent brands to move from the first wave of success to more sustainable growth. “

For a novelty bookstore, that means photo takers are coming back and spending money, even when retail sales have been slow.

Some bring in specialty supermarkets, hairdressers and events with book authors to create a community that can meet the needs of an entire family or those of a specific demographic, JLL’s Zhu said. “From my perspective, I believe the bookstore can survive,” he said. “They can survive depending on their changing strategy to adapt to the changing retail market. “


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Our reading habits have changed with pandemic closures – here’s how https://hiocpely.com/our-reading-habits-have-changed-with-pandemic-closures-heres-how/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/our-reading-habits-have-changed-with-pandemic-closures-heres-how/ Raise your hand if, around 20 months ago, you thought you were taking advantage of the pandemic lockdown to do more reading. Now, raise your hand if those good intentions really manifested themselves in a pile of unread books on your nightstand. The pandemic has changed the way we live a lot over the past […]]]>

Raise your hand if, around 20 months ago, you thought you were taking advantage of the pandemic lockdown to do more reading.

Now, raise your hand if those good intentions really manifested themselves in a pile of unread books on your nightstand.

The pandemic has changed the way we live a lot over the past two years – how we shop, how we socialize, how we work. It also had an effect on our reading habits.

“What I noticed during the pandemic was that I was starting a book and sort of lost interest in it,” Natasha Rajah, professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, told Montreal.

And it wasn’t just the number of books she normally read that was changing. “The quality of my reading has gone down.”

Before the pandemic, Rajah said she could easily read for an hour or two before going to bed. But she found she couldn’t keep her attention on a book anymore, so she stopped reading and turned to Twitter instead.

On the other end of the spectrum, Sean Wilson, artistic director of the Ottawa Writers’ Festival, found books to be a loophole – a way of dealing with the reality of what happens when all isn’t right. .

“For me, it’s been really fascinating to realize that I have to deal with the things that I’m not comfortable with,” he said.

“The stories about suffering have actually been the most helpful at the moment because it’s like it puts it in a form you can metabolize. The kind of community you get by being on someone’s mind. another, in someone else’s heart. “

Sean Wilson, artistic director of the Ottawa Writers Festival, said being able to delve into a good book during the lockdown was a great form of escape for him. (Submitted by Sean Wilson)

Containment of reading habits

The pandemic has put a lot of stress on our brains – stress that many of us have never really lived with before. People reported mental health problems, having trouble concentrating, or just find motivation to get things done.

And those who weren’t able to work suddenly found themselves with hours to fill each day. Books seemed to help.

A Angus Reid Poll conducted in April 2020 asked Canadian adults with more free time during the first lockdown how they were filling that time. About 40 percent said they read more.

In terms of what they were reading – a smaller survey of Canadians conducted by BookNet Canada during a similar period found that of the 450 people who identified as readers, most (62%) said they hadn’t really changed what they read in terms of topic.

But 22% said they read more “informative” books, while 16% just looked for entertaining reads.

Books are seen in the window of a Vancouver bookstore. Polls suggest Canadians are reading more during the first pandemic lockdown. (Ben Nelms / CBC)

Reading is not always an escape

A quick glance at the types of books that topped North America’s bestseller lists over the past year also sheds light on how readers feel. They included books on race, reconciliation, politics and even plagues, which could confuse people who wanted nothing more from their reading than to escape the bad news surrounding the pandemic.

Those looking to find out more about what’s going on around them in real life might feel “a kind of moral obligation,” Clayton Childress, professor of sociology at the University of Toronto, said by email. It is “part of their identity as an individual, or socially as a person who enjoys being up to date and participating in conversations about current affairs.”

But another book that topped the New York Times non-fiction bestseller list in February 2021 was first published in 2014. The body keeps the score by Bessel van der Kolk deals with trauma and how to reconnect a traumatized brain. As of this writing, he is always at the top of the list.

Marcello Giovanelli helped launch the UK’s Lockdown Library Project to see what people were reading during the first wave of COVID-19. (Submitted by Marcello Giovanelli)

Marcello Giovanelli wanted to go beyond the bestseller lists.

The senior lecturer at Aston University in Birmingham, England was one of the researchers at the Lockdown Library Project, which investigated people’s reading habits during the UK’s first pandemic lockdown

Around 860 people responded to the social media call to participate in an online survey conducted by Giovanelli and his colleagues between July 1 and August 31, 2020.

While the full survey results are still being processed, researchers can already draw conclusions – they found that about two-thirds of those polled said they read more during that first lockdown.

“A lot of people talked about books like old friends,” Giovanelli said, and described reading as a kind of therapy – a space where they could escape safely. Her research also found that most of those interviewed said they were drawn to novels.

“If what’s going on in the real world isn’t particularly enjoyable, it can be even nicer,” he said. “If you have the time to do it, sure.”

Lack of time to read

It was another challenge. While some thought they would have more time to read, a third of people who responded to Giovanelli’s survey said they read less. Many of these people said it was because they no longer commute to work and the lack of train or bus trips meant less time to sit and read.

Children have dropped out of school and need special attention for home schooling.

Natasha Rajah, professor at McGill University, believes our brains will recover from pandemic stress. (Submitted by Natasha Rajah)

But for Rajah, the professor of psychiatry, it was just a matter of feeling that his brain couldn’t handle reading. She studies the cognitive neurosciences of memory, so she understands why it’s difficult at times like this to stay focused enough to read.

She says the combination of increased stress and anxiety from the pandemic, along with working from home with more distractions, means it’s harder for us to filter out unimportant noise and focus.

“And to kind of build that narrative in your mind, you rely on working memory, and you also rely on the ability to access what we call semantic memory – your knowledge of the world, you know, your knowledge. of what certain contexts evoke in you. ”

In other words, where following a story in your mind was once effortless and joyful, it has now become hard work.

The good news, says Rajah, is if you were an avid reader before the pandemic but have been struggling to read lately, don’t worry. The brain recovers.

“The brain is very plastic and you know, these aren’t lesions or… permanent changes in brain function. Our brains learn and adapt.

“And I believe in the resilience of the human brain. So I think we’re going to get over it.”


Written by Stéphanie Hogan. Interviews conducted by Kristin Nelson.

The Angus Reid Institute conducted an online survey that was conducted in two waves of representative randomized samples of 4,240 Canadian adult Angus Reid Forum members between April 1 and 6, 2020, and 2,129 Canadian adult members. of the Angus Reid Forum between April 4-6, 2020. We cannot accurately calculate a margin of error for methodologies with online surveys. For comparison purposes only, probability samples of these sizes would have margins of error of +/- 2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

BookNet Canada’s conclusions have arrived via an online survey that was conducted among English-speaking Canadian adults by one of their panel partners. We cannot accurately calculate a margin of error for methodologies with online surveys. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of the same size would give a margin of error of +/- 4%, 19 times out of 20.


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