Reading Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:01:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hiocpely.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hiocpely-icon.jpg Reading Books – Hiocpely http://hiocpely.com/ 32 32 Abdulrazak Gurnah receives the Nobel Prize for Literature https://hiocpely.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-receives-the-nobel-prize-for-literature/ https://hiocpely.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-receives-the-nobel-prize-for-literature/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:32:35 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-receives-the-nobel-prize-for-literature/ The Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded Thursday to Abdulrazak Gurnah for “his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the plight of the refugee in the chasm between cultures and continents”. Gurnah was born in Zanzibar, now part of Tanzania, in 1948, but currently lives in Britain. He left Zanzibar at […]]]>

The Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded Thursday to Abdulrazak Gurnah for “his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the plight of the refugee in the chasm between cultures and continents”.

Gurnah was born in Zanzibar, now part of Tanzania, in 1948, but currently lives in Britain. He left Zanzibar at the age of 18 as a refugee after a violent uprising in 1964 in which soldiers overthrew the country’s government. He is the first African to win the award – considered the most prestigious in world literature – in nearly two decades.

He is fifth overall, after Wole Soyinka of Nigeria in 1986, Naguib Mahfouz of Egypt, who won in 1988; and South African winners Nadine Gordimer in 1991 and John Maxwell Coetzee in 2003.

Gurnah’s 10 novels include “Memory of Departure,” “Pilgrims Way” and “Dottie,” all of which deal with the immigrant experience in Britain; “Paradise,” selected for the Booker Prize in 1994, about a boy in an East African country marked by colonialism; and “Admiring Silence”, about a young man who leaves Zanzibar for England, where he gets married and becomes a teacher.

Gurnah’s first language is Swahili, but he adopted English as his literary language, his prose often tinged with traces of Swahili, Arabic and German.

Anders Olsson, chairman of the awarding committee, told a press conference on Thursday that Gurnah “is widely recognized as one of the world’s foremost post-colonial writers.” Gurnah “constantly and with great compassion penetrated the effects of colonialism in East Africa and its effects on the lives of uprooted and migrant individuals,” he added.

The characters in his novels, said Olsson, “find themselves in the chasm between cultures and continents, between the life left behind and the life to come, confronting racism and prejudice, but also forcing themselves to silence the truth or to reinvent the biography to avoid conflicts. with reality.

Laura Winters, writing in The New York Times in 1996, called “Paradise” a “scintillating, oblique coming-of-age fable,” adding that “Admiring Silence” was a work that “skillfully portrays the agony of ‘a man caught between two cultures, each of which would deny him for his links with the other.

In an interview with the Africainwords website earlier this year, Gurnah explained how, in his recent book ‘Afterlives’, he sought to shed light on how those affected by war and colonialism are shaped but not defined by these experiences, and how this grew out of stories that ‘he heard growing up. in Zanzibar.

“I was surrounded by people who experienced these things firsthand and who were talking about them,” he said. “These stories have always been with me and I needed time to organize them in this story. My academic work also shaped these stories.

Gurnah noted that throughout his career he has dealt with issues of displacement, exile, identity and belonging.

“There are different ways of experiencing belonging and non-belonging. How do people see themselves as part of a community? How are some included and others excluded? Who owns the community? he said.

As a prelude to this year’s award ceremony, the literature award was cited for lack of diversity among its laureates. Journalist Greta Thurfjell, write in Dagens Nyheter, a Swedish newspaper, noted that 95 of the 117 former Nobel laureates came from Europe or North America, and only 16 winners were women. “Can it really go on like this?” ” she asked.

American poet Louise Glück received the Literature Prize last year for writing “that with austere beauty makes individual existence universal”, according to the quote from the Nobel Committee. Its price was seen as a much needed price reset after several years of scandal.

In 2018, the academy postponed the award after the husband of an academy member was accused of sexual misconduct and leaking the names of the contestants to bookies. Academy member Jean-Claude Arnault was then sentenced to two years in prison for rape.

The following year, the academy awarded the 2018 Deferred Prize to Olga Tokarczuk, an experimental Polish novelist. But the academy has come under fire for awarding the 2019 prize to Peter Handke, an Austrian author and playwright who has been accused of genocide denial for questioning events during the Balkan Wars of the 1990s, including the massacre of Srebrenica, in which around 8,000 Muslim men and boys were murdered.

Lawmakers in Albania, Bosnia and Kosovo have denounced the decision, as have several prominent novelists, including Jennifer Egan and Hari Kunzru.

  • David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian received the Physiology or Medicine Prize on Monday for their findings on how people experience heat, cold, touch and their own bodily movements.

  • Three scientists whose work “laid the foundation for our knowledge of Earth’s climate and how humanity influences it” received the physics award on Tuesday: Syukuro Manabe of Princeton University; Klaus Hasselmann of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany; and Giorgio Parisi from La Sapienza University in Rome

  • Benjamin List and David WC MacMillan received the chemistry prize on Wednesday for the development of a more environmentally friendly tool for building molecules.


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Eight books to add to your fall reading list https://hiocpely.com/eight-books-to-add-to-your-fall-reading-list/ https://hiocpely.com/eight-books-to-add-to-your-fall-reading-list/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:50:20 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/eight-books-to-add-to-your-fall-reading-list/ Nothing says fall is here like warming up with a fluffy blanket, a hot cup of coffee, and an exciting new book. Whether you want something that will expand your knowledge, escape you into a fictional world, or teach you about the real life of a real person, we have some great suggestions for your […]]]>

Nothing says fall is here like warming up with a fluffy blanket, a hot cup of coffee, and an exciting new book. Whether you want something that will expand your knowledge, escape you into a fictional world, or teach you about the real life of a real person, we have some great suggestions for your fall reading list.

Jean Hanff Korelitz’s plot

Available now

This gripping novel is one of those books to keep on reading all night long. The story follows Jacob Finch Bonner, a once promising young novelist turned MFA professor, who publishes a student’s work under his name after the student’s death. But then Jacob’s secrets start to catch up with him and someone – but who? – threatens to expose it. Will Jacob be able to follow his lies? Who exactly was this student of his? And who is trying to reveal the truth? Jean Hanff Korelitz keeps readers on their toes and ready to move on to the next page.

Misfits by Michaela Coel

Available now

In case her Emmy win for Outstanding Writing wasn’t enough to convince you that Michaela Coel is a talented writer, maybe Unsuitable will. The creator and star of I can destroy you and Chewing gum wrote a beautifully written story about the ups and downs of trying to stand out. “By accepting our differences, she says, we can transform our lives. Unsuitable is an honest account that encourages all of us to be “misfits” ourselves.

Live No Lies: Recognize and resist the TThree enemies that sabotage your peace by John Marc Comer

Available now

In our daily lives, explains John Mark Comer, we face three major enemies: the devil, the flesh and the world. In Live without lies, Comer identifies each of these enemies and the role they play in our lives, and how we can overcome them. You can learn to find and maintain true peace by identifying lies and replacing them with the truth.

He spoke with the RELEVANT podcast about his book ahead of its launch, which you can listen to. here.

Body Wisdom: Finding Healing, Wholeness, and Connection Through A Life Embodied By Hillary McBride

Available October 12

Hillary McBride, award-winning psychologist and researcher, explores the broken and unhealthy ideas we have about our bodies in The wisdom of the body. In this book, McBride expertly explains how various systems of influence in our world shape the way we see ourselves and our bodies. She combines a personal story with years of research to provide practice and advice on how we can view our bodies in a holistic and healthy state of mind. “Instead of the body being a problem to overcome, our body can be the very place where we feel most alive, the seat of our spirituality and wisdom.

Divine Disturbance: Holding On To Faith When Life Breaks Your Heart by Tony Evans, Chrystal Evans Hurst, Priscilla Shirer, Anthony Evans, Jonathan Evans

Available November 9

Dr Tony Evans is joined by his four children – Chrystal, Priscilla, Anthony and Jonathan – in their first book together as a family. Divine disturbance explores the various trials we all experience in life and how God can come through with the power of hope. In the book, the Evans family discusses their faith-shattering experiences, from grief over losing six loved ones in less than two years, including the family matriarch, to an exploration of handling the various curved balls. difficult and unexpected. It’s a timely message that everyone can find a way to relate to.

See also


My body by Emily Ratajkowski

Available November 9

Emily Ratajkowski, model, actress, entrepreneur and now writer, gets deeply vulnerable and honest about what it means to be a woman and a commodity in My body. The essays explore moments in Ratajkowski’s life while investigating the fetishization of girl culture and female beauty, her obsession and disregard for female sexuality, the perverse dynamics of the fashion and film industries, and the gray area between consent and abuse. Ratajkowski’s experience in her career and personal life makes her an excellent choice to provide insight into the subject of the commodification of women in our culture.

I wish you were there by Jodi Picoult

Available November 30

Jodi Picoult is an accomplished author of 27 bestselling books. Of The Book of Two Ways To Small big things, Picoult knows how to turn a bleak situation into a hopeful experience.

In Wish you were Here, Diana O’Toole’s life was derailed when her trip to Galapagos quickly derailed. She finds herself isolated and out of her comfort zone, slowly uncovering the truth about her relationships, her choices, and herself. Picoult weaves humor and wit with moments of truth and vulnerability in his latest novel.

Call us what we carry by Amanda Gorman

Available December 7

Presidential inaugural poet and New York Times Best-selling author Amanda Gorman has a sense of words. In Call us what we transport, Gorman explores this chaotic moment in time and transforms it into a melodic poem of hope and healing. She leaves no stone unturned in her poems, exploring history, language, identity, grief and erasure to reflect on our past and be a voice of hope for the future.


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5 Faculty Books Attractive Enough For Any Student To Read | Campus news https://hiocpely.com/5-faculty-books-attractive-enough-for-any-student-to-read-campus-news/ https://hiocpely.com/5-faculty-books-attractive-enough-for-any-student-to-read-campus-news/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 19:39:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/5-faculty-books-attractive-enough-for-any-student-to-read-campus-news/ On the first floor of the Hodges Library, the Miles Reading Room contains a three-shelf section filled with books written by UT professors. Books on everything from social work to poetry can be found in this hidden corner. Here is a list of interesting books written by UT professors that students can easily access from […]]]>

On the first floor of the Hodges Library, the Miles Reading Room contains a three-shelf section filled with books written by UT professors. Books on everything from social work to poetry can be found in this hidden corner.

Here is a list of interesting books written by UT professors that students can easily access from the library.

“#Awkward Politics: Technologies of Popfeminist Activism”, co-authored by Maria Stehle, associate professor of German

Lovers of Netflix’s “Moxie” will find their place in this book. “Awkward Politics” talks about feminism in an awkward and youthful way. It attracts readers early on with strong language of a Facebook post from user Riot Grrl Berlin inviting readers to take a walk in Berlin. With real images and sources, the book describes how feminism has shown itself in the media, in all its forms.

The book uses advanced language, but contrasts with original photos and primary sources. Readers can easily skip a chapter or jump from cover to cover while still being able to understand the book.

“Zen Inspirations: Meditations and Essential Texts” by Miriam Levering, Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies

This book can be a nice break from the always hectic life of a student.

“Zen Inspirations” is an anthology of poems written by Zen masters, with corresponding photographs all of which have to do with the Buddhist practice of Zen. Each poem is accompanied by a color, illustration or photo, creating an immersive experience. The book is easy to read and stimulating. When the book opens, calm spreads.

“Housebound” by Elizabeth Gentry, Senior Lecturer in English

“Housebound” is a book for book lovers. It plunges the reader into a whirlwind of writings and transports them into the life of Maggie, the main character. “Housebound” is a book to really pay attention to. As all book lovers know, every word counts in this book.

It is a story that many girls can relate to, that of caring for their siblings and helping parents. It’s a story that is not a fairy tale but is written almost like a Hans-Christian-Anderson tale about the painful life of an eldest daughter.

“The Curse of Poseidon: British Naval Impression and the Atlantic Origins of the American Revolution” by Christopher P. Magra, Professor of History

“The Curse of Poseidon” tells the story of the American Revolution with an emphasis on the Atlantic Ocean. It’s written like a novel and a historical narrative at the same time. It grabs readers’ attention early on by setting the scene in some sort of yellow Star Wars text.

Advanced writing is used in this book, however, the way it is written keeps readers engaged. For history buffs and the American Revolutionary, it’s somewhat reminiscent of the popular “History that Doesn’t Suck” podcast.

“A hidden newspaper in the Lodz ghetto”, edited by Helene Sinnreich, associate professor of religious studies

This diary is by Heniek Fogel, a Jew imprisoned in the Lodz ghetto in 1942 when he was 19 years old. He describes the horrors of the Nazi ghettos. The book is really graphic and difficult to read. However, this is a real and moving story that is important to remember. Fogel finds out how to survive in the ghetto throughout the book, in a horribly true way.

The book is heavy to read, but the language is simple. The context surrounding the log entries is explained.


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“The Beginning of the Snowball”: The Snarls Reach Publishing Supply Chain https://hiocpely.com/the-beginning-of-the-snowball-the-snarls-reach-publishing-supply-chain/ https://hiocpely.com/the-beginning-of-the-snowball-the-snarls-reach-publishing-supply-chain/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 09:00:24 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/the-beginning-of-the-snowball-the-snarls-reach-publishing-supply-chain/ When publishers print books in the United States, these labor and transportation issues still apply, but they face other complications as well. After years of printing press shutdowns and shutdowns, the demand for book printing nationwide now exceeds available capacity. The factories that remain sometimes do not have enough people to run them, so much-needed […]]]>

When publishers print books in the United States, these labor and transportation issues still apply, but they face other complications as well. After years of printing press shutdowns and shutdowns, the demand for book printing nationwide now exceeds available capacity. The factories that remain sometimes do not have enough people to run them, so much-needed machines can sit idle.

All of these problems complicate each other. “Trucks are more expensive, containers are more expensive, labor is more expensive,” said Jon Yaged, president of Macmillan’s US business books division. “And all the extra touches. Previously, you would place a purchase order and it wouldn’t arrive until two weeks later. Now it’s 10 keys and 15 emails. It’s a lot more work.

This mess led to a cascade of release date changes, sometimes delaying a book for a few weeks, other times for months, completely missing the holiday shopping season. Parag Khanna’s “Move” was previously scheduled for release on Tuesday, but is now slated for release next week. Princeton University Press pushed Mark Atwood Lawrence’s “end of ambition” from October to November. “Smahtguy,” a graphic novel about former depicting Barney Frank, was delayed by Metropolitan Books, a Macmillan imprint, from fall through spring. Publishers view these changes as a last resort, as a date change can result in the removal of events or reporting, the cancellation of retail promotions, and the reduction of orders placed. Publishers have prioritized upcoming book calendars that they expect to be their biggest sellers.

There isn’t much anyone in the book business can do to fix this problem. Retailers, authors and distributors are begging readers and customers to buy or order early. Publishers plan more in advance and sometimes even put book shipments on airplanes. One publisher said it currently costs about 35 to 50 cents per book to send titles across the water, and $ 5 to $ 8 per air. No one knows when things will get back to normal, but it won’t be until long after this holiday season.

Perhaps the biggest problem before the holidays will be reprints, which are needed when a book’s initial order is low and needs to be restocked. Normally, this kind of order takes about three weeks. Now it may take three months.

This is where “All the troubles that are common these days” got into trouble. The book, which chronicles an American woman who helped lead the German resistance against the Nazis, did not run out of print everywhere, but it took weeks to get new inventory to warehouses, then extra time to get it through. to retailers. (Barnes & Noble, as well as many independent stores, had copies from the start – its non-fiction buyer loved the book, according to Shannon DeVito, director of books at Barnes & Noble, so the chain ordered a lot. ) It took more for Amazon. more than seven weeks to retrieve the copies in stock.

Indeed, one factor compounding these problems is good news for the industry: the demand for printed books is high. Revenues from publishers’ commercial books, which include most fiction, non-fiction and general interest titles, grew nearly 10% last year compared to 2019, according to the Association of American Publishers , and increased by 17% for the first six months of 2021, compared to the same period in 2020.


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Spencertown Academy Book Festival Features Virtual Author Lectures, Book Sale | Berkshire landscapes https://hiocpely.com/spencertown-academy-book-festival-features-virtual-author-lectures-book-sale-berkshire-landscapes/ https://hiocpely.com/spencertown-academy-book-festival-features-virtual-author-lectures-book-sale-berkshire-landscapes/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/spencertown-academy-book-festival-features-virtual-author-lectures-book-sale-berkshire-landscapes/ CHATHAM, NY – Former UN worker Jill Kalotay loves books. The same goes for the 2,000 people and volunteers who attend the Spencertown Academy Arts Center annual conference. Book Festival. Too many for the current climate, the 16th festival will spend a second year online. If you are going to Spencertown Academy Arts Center 2021 […]]]>

CHATHAM, NY – Former UN worker Jill Kalotay loves books. The same goes for the 2,000 people and volunteers who attend the Spencertown Academy Arts Center annual conference. Book Festival. Too many for the current climate, the 16th festival will spend a second year online.

Kalotay is co-chairing the festival, its sixth, with David Highfill, editor-in-chief of HarperCollins publisher William Morrow.

“I am a reader and a lover of books,” Kalotay said in a telephone interview. “Our family has always been like this. My daughter is a writer and my Hungarian husband is very bookish.

As the Academy is a completely voluntary organization, she added, “everything we do is a labor of love.”






Ayad_Akhtar.jpg

Pulitzer Prize winner Ayad Akhtar, author of “Homeland Elegies,” is one of the many presenters at the Spencertown Academy Arts Center Virtual Book Festival 2021.




Leading a wide range of free Zoom lectures is Pulitzer Prize-winning author and playwright Ayad Akhtar, whose “Elegy of the Fatherland“on a Pakistani immigrant and US-born son was selected as one of the New York Times’ Top 10 Books of 2020. The neighboring Kinderhook resident was recently named a New York state author.

Returning is New York Times historian and contributor Russell Shorto, author of “Smalltime: a story of my family and the crowd. “Located in Pittsburgh,” the things he finds out about his family are amazing and heartwarming, “Kalotay said.

Author and illustrator Peter Sis, the first children’s book illustrator to win the MacArthur Fellowship, will talk about his book, “Nicky and Vera: a silent Holocaust hero and the children he saved“, the story of a little-known British hero who saved hundreds of Jewish children in Czechoslovakia from World War II.

“There is a lot of autobiography in the work he writes,” Kalotay said. “He is a world-renowned artist, famous for his peaceful approach.”

Librarian Ann Gainer will read “Nicky and Vera” in a program suitable for ages 8 and up; and author Nancy Castaldo will engage young readers with “Sniffer Dogs: How Dogs (and Their Noses) Save the World”.

Also appearing are historical novelists Rishi Reddi – his first “Passage West” features a Punjabi family with Mexican in-laws and Japanese neighbors during World War I in California – and Dexter Palmer, author of an 18th century tale. “Marie Toft; or, The Rabbit Queen“.

Sonia Purnell’s “A Woman of No Importance” and Clare Mulley’s “The Spy Who Loved” both feature notable WWII women.

The graphic memoir of acclaimed comic book artist, illustrator and writer Michael Kupperman, “All the Answers” follows his father’s fame on the mid-20th century television and radio show “Quiz Kids”.

In a festival premiere, Rick Rodgers will demonstrate the baking of Almas Pite – a Hungarian apple pie – from his book “Kaffeehaus: Exquisite Desserts from Classic Cafés”.

“She is a very accessible and entertaining person,” said Kalotay, whose mother-in-law taught him “all about Hungarian cuisine”.

The 2021 and 2020 conferences will be published on the Academy website Youtube channel. They are always free, said Kalotay, “but we really appreciate the donations.”

SPECIAL BOOKS FOR SALE

The Academy raises funds through its extensive book sale, organized for 10 years by former antique book dealer and retired judge Wayne Greene.

“I took a leave [from law] become a bookseller, ”Greene said in a telephone interview from Manhattan. “It was my passion.”

Previously, books were mostly sold at a price. “I started to collect through donations, to find the true value of books,” said Greene. “I would find treasures.

It examines each volume for signatures, margins, and condition.

Presented in the special book room, the individually priced books increased revenue by 25%.

“Historically, booksellers attended and left with huge deals. I still left room in the pricing for them to make a profit.

In 2019, book sales brought in around $ 29,000, an all-time high. After moving online last year, however, “we made $ 12,000, a third of what we normally do,” Greene said.

Unlike the 20,000 volumes typical of past years, online sales are limited to 500 items. Subjects include art, architecture, photography, fiction, biography, history, cookbooks and children, as well as CDs, DVDs, LPs and ephemera. Prices start at $ 5, with some 250 books priced at $ 25 and up.

“A lot of beautiful art books have been donated this year,” Green said. “One of our best offers is ‘Portraits, Figures and Landscapes’, a seven-volume set of complete paintings by John Singer Sargent in mint condition. We are asking for $ 750.

It is interesting to note a 1904 first edition of “Italian Villas and Their Gardens” by Edith Wharton, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, priced at $ 250.

The crown jewel of this year’s sale is Mark Twain’s “1875 Sketches New and Old” with black and white engraved illustrations, offered at $ 1,000.

“One of our neighbors was editing his property,” Greene said. “This book belonged to his father or his grandfather, it is a very rare first edition that is rarely seen.”

Touching and owning a book is nothing like a digital experience, he suggested. “It’s just a much more rewarding experience than reading something on a screen.”

“I love looking at the shelf and remembering the pleasant experience I had reading the book.”


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What to read this fall https://hiocpely.com/what-to-read-this-fall/ https://hiocpely.com/what-to-read-this-fall/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 21:41:00 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/what-to-read-this-fall/ Anthony Doerr’s first novel since “All the Light We Can’t See”. Comment from Maureen Corrigan Robert E. Lee Review: A Man of Marble, But No Pedestal A historian returns to the reputation and moral guilt of the Confederate general. Fergus M. Bordewich live review Read the review Anthony Bourdain: Feast of memory Four books look […]]]>

Anthony Doerr’s first novel since “All the Light We Can’t See”. Comment from Maureen Corrigan

Robert E. Lee Review: A Man of Marble, But No Pedestal

A historian returns to the reputation and moral guilt of the Confederate general. Fergus M. Bordewich live review

Read the review

Anthony Bourdain: Feast of memory

Four books look back on the hectic life of a “companion chef” who became a world star. Rien Fertel’s review

Read the review

Journal “Empire and Jihad”: North African collision

Four stories of imperial plans and disastrous results as British force met resistance in Egypt and elsewhere. Review by Maxwell Carter

Read the review

Review “Why religion is good for American democracy”: the rebirth of the big tent

A sociologist argues that the range of American religious traditions is a marker of civic health. Comment from Barton Swaim

Read the review

‘On Animals’ review: Beastly Bounty

Susan Orlean follows oxen in Cuba, donkeys in Morocco and a killer whale whose fate takes an improbable, cinematic turn. Jeremy McCarter live review

Read the review

‘The Baseball 100’ Review: Final Score

Joe Posnanski’s ultimate player rankings are a sure-fire way to make arguments. Reviewed by Leigh Montville

Read the review

Two books on the English country house

Formerly the domain of kings and dukes, the English country house must have found more modest uses in modern times. Comment from Moira Hodgson

Read the review

‘The Amur River’ review: Where empires divide and rivalries begin

A journey from a sacred Mongolian spring along a river which is also a gap in history. Review by Tunku Varadarajan

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Examination of “rationality”: let’s be reasonable

Steven Pinker argues that by cultivating humility we can help the facts defeat the myth. Review by Andrew Stark

Read the review

“A Thousand Trails Home” review: Caribou culture

Celebrate an endangered way of life in the northernmost part of the country. Richard Adams Carey live review

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Major Labels review: hits keep coming

A journey through popular music with only one criterion: excitement. David Kirby live review

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Review of ‘Jean Sibelius’: a first final

He was considered the greatest symphonist since Brahms, but at some point – mysteriously – no new works appeared. Review by Tim Page

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Review of “Malice in Wonderland”: Orbiting the Planet Cecil

When Hugo Vickers was asked to write the biography of photographer Cecil Beaton, it was a ticket to a strange new world. Dominic Green’s review

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“The Lincoln Highway” review: unlikely trip

Amor Towles takes his characters on a tour of mid-20th century America. Comment from Joanne Kaufman

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Fiction: The review of “Palmares” by Gayl Jones

A highly anticipated novel from the author of “The Healing”. Review by Sam Sacks

Read the review

Mysteries: the review “April in Spain” by John Banville

Plus “1979” by Val McDermid and “The Heron’s Cry” by Ann Cleeves. Tom Nolan live review

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Review of “Dog Park”: its eggs, another’s nest

In Sofi Oksanen’s psychological thriller, the body of a young woman is part of a trade that crosses borders. Comment from Liesl Schillinger

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Science-fiction: the critique of “Holdout” by Jeffrey Kluger

An astronaut follows his consciousness in a near-future orbital thriller. Review by Tom Shippey

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Children’s books: the review of “Pony” by RJ Palacio

Plus “The Beatryce Prophecy”, “Kaleidoscope”, “Daughter of the Deep”, “It Fell From the Sky” and others. Meghan Cox Gurdon live review

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Best Five: Books on Travel to America

Selected by Nathaniel Philbrick, the most recent author of “Travels With George”.

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Theologian presents God as few readers will have seen him before https://hiocpely.com/theologian-presents-god-as-few-readers-will-have-seen-him-before/ https://hiocpely.com/theologian-presents-god-as-few-readers-will-have-seen-him-before/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:35:24 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/theologian-presents-god-as-few-readers-will-have-seen-him-before/ October 2, 2021 God: an anatomy. By Francesca Stavrakopoulou. Picador; 608 pages; £ 25. To be published in America by Knopf in January; $ 35 PTHEOLOGY TEACHERS are imagined as dull and gentle souls. This book, however, is a loud rebellious cry. Francesca Stavrakopoulou, as a student, was annoyed to learn that the physical representations […]]]>

God: an anatomy. By Francesca Stavrakopoulou. Picador; 608 pages; £ 25. To be published in America by Knopf in January; $ 35

PTHEOLOGY TEACHERS are imagined as dull and gentle souls. This book, however, is a loud rebellious cry. Francesca Stavrakopoulou, as a student, was annoyed to learn that the physical representations of the Judeo-Christian God in the Bible were only metaphorical, or lyrical, or poetic. He was invisible and ineffable, of course. She wasn’t supposed to see him bodily at all. But, she worried, why not? Why shouldn’t she see him “as a gigantic man with a heavy step, arms in hand and breath hot as sulfur”? Like someone who loved roast meat and pretty girls, laughed and screamed and cried? In short, as the ancient Israelites who were the first to worship Yahweh so vividly painted it?

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The result of his annoyance is a learned but exhilarating journey through all aspects of Yahweh’s body, from top to bottom (yes, that too) and from the inside out. The God in whom millions of Christians proclaim their faith every Sunday is firmly placed in a large crowd of other deities in Southwest Asia: Baal, Marduk of Babylon, Ninurta of Mesopotamia, Adad of Assyria, Teshub, Tishpak and Ra . He started life as nothing important, a minor storm god, one of the 70 children of El, the Levantine father of the gods. Then he usurped the throne, and his reign began: in the midst of tumultuous technicolor and with all the aspects, traits and faults of human beings who dutifully threw themselves face down before him.

Rightly so for a book that aims to upset the notion of the troubled and spiritualized creator, Ms. Stavrakopoulou begins with her feet. Huge feet, which wander in landscapes creating sacred spaces and which, north-west of Aleppo in Syria, enter a temple and never leave. Feet which can trample on enemies like grapes one day and, the next day, relax, propped up on a stool. (Until its destruction, the Temple in Jerusalem was considered God’s preferred footstool.)

Walking with God, now a description of holy closeness and spiritual holiness, was in ancient times a kind of male bonding exercise, over rugged terrain, with Yahweh setting the pace, sure-footed in the sandals that all the local gods wore. The worshiper, on the other hand, walked barefoot, while Yahweh cried out that Moses should be approaching the burning bush. Moses appears in this book as by far the most successful walker with God, even coming to resemble him, and later acquiring in art the original bull horns of Yahweh on his head, which Yahweh himself had by then lost in light rays and a mass of white hair.

The feet and legs are followed by the genitals. Here, Mrs. Stavrakopoulou is having almost too much fun. God’s penis becomes the center of all kinds of divine actions: to make the world fruitful, to impose order on the cosmos, to run wild like a bull, to shoot with bow and arrow. Every mention of a bow, she assures readers, really means a penis; even the rainbow is a polychrome celestial tool.

But his goal is serious: to show that God has been regularly and prudently emasculated. The main concern of the biblical God was to defend his prerogative to have sex with whomever he wanted, sometimes in shocking ways. According to Eve, he is Cain’s father, much to her surprise. And in the book of Ezekiel, he covets Israel as a teenage girl:

Your breasts have formed, your [pubic] the hair had grown; you were naked and naked! I walked past you and looked at you: you were at the age of making love. I spread the corner of my coat over you and covered your nakedness …

Rape, in other words. In the book of Hosea, it is even more explicit: God takes the teenager Israel to walk in the desert, “and there she will cry”. Then he gives her earrings, bracelets, a necklace and a crown, presenting her as his own beautiful property.

The book travels on God’s back, turned as a sign of his displeasure, though Moses on Sinai begs to see his forehead shimmering with the rainbow; her shiny white skin, a former source of persistent racial prejudice; his guts, which twist in pain when the Babylonians attack Jerusalem; his right hand, creator and molder of humans, on which he leans like a potter on a wheel; his writing and typing arm. Yahweh’s stomach is fine and perceptive: he awaits the crème de la crème, the first-born of the herd and the “fat parts” of the animals, withdrawing his protective arm and sulking if they do not appear. (An astonishing passage describes a present Passover in Samaria, with the mass slaughter of lambs and blood smeared on the doorposts, as if it was always necessary.) Deities other than himself, especially those made of wood or stone, are “gods of shit”, says God.

After all this daring or evil behavior of the humanized Father, God made man in the Son is a breath of fresh air. Jesus, whenever he makes a rare appearance, appears attractive, rational, understated, and modern. Yet the ties with Yahweh continue naturally. The washing of the feet of his disciples is a return to the notion of barefoot holiness in the presence of Yahweh. The moment he writes with his finger in the dust to save a woman from stoning, crushing the Torah in the Temple itself, is a reminder of the finger of God who spoke of the ten plagues of Egypt and inscribed the Ten Commandments on stone tablets. Most shocking, in several Renaissance pietas the deposed body of Christ is represented erect under his loincloth, a sign of virility defying the death of the Creator God.

Such scenes more or less guarantee that many readers will find this book offensive. So many, and probably more, will find it informative, lively, and often hilarious. Above all, it is a corrective to the idea that, when it comes to religion, modern Christians and Jews have become inordinately sophisticated.

Even though most believers openly reject an anthropomorphic God as a primitive idea (Islam, of course, rejects the notion entirely), they still offer prayers to a being who they assume is listening to them, and sometimes even theirs. respond. Indeed, it would be a rare member of a Christian congregation who, invoking God the Father in the usual Sunday manner, does not at least mentally catch a glimpse of a floating beard, a white robe and those enormous sandal feet.

This article appeared in the Books & Arts section of the print edition under the title “Avec son bras tendu”


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5 books to read after “Beautiful Country” by Qian Julie Wang https://hiocpely.com/5-books-to-read-after-beautiful-country-by-qian-julie-wang/ https://hiocpely.com/5-books-to-read-after-beautiful-country-by-qian-julie-wang/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 14:14:09 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/5-books-to-read-after-beautiful-country-by-qian-julie-wang/ For the month of September, Jenna Bush Hager has selected “Beautiful Country” by Qian Julie Wang like her pick from the Read With Jenna book club. Wang’s early memoirs tell the story of her life as an undocumented immigrant in New York’s Chinatown. “’Beautiful Country’ was one of those remarkable books that will stay with […]]]>

For the month of September, Jenna Bush Hager has selected “Beautiful Country” by Qian Julie Wang like her pick from the Read With Jenna book club.

Wang’s early memoirs tell the story of her life as an undocumented immigrant in New York’s Chinatown.

“’Beautiful Country’ was one of those remarkable books that will stay with you long after you’ve finished reading it,” Jenna said. “I love memoirs and especially love beautifully written memoirs that read almost like novels.”

If you liked “Beautiful Country” as much as Jenna did, the author has five book recommendations to read next.

“The glass castle”, by Jeanette Walls

Boasting over seven years on the New York Times bestseller list, Jeannette Walls’ compelling story of resilience and redemption comes highly recommended by fans of the Read With Jenna Book Club.

Walls tells the story of her life, growing up with a brilliant father who suffered from alcoholism, a free-spirited mother who stepped away from the responsibility of raising a family, and her three siblings who learned to take care of each other when their parents couldn’t.

The book is an honest and compelling look at a special yet loyal family. Walls’ gift for storytelling shines as she shares the intimate details of her unconventional upbringing.

“I know why the bird in a cage sings”, by Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou’s autobiography, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” tells the story of the first years of her life. She talks about the experience of bigotry, feeling lonely as a child and overcoming trauma. This beloved coming of age story has become an American classic.

“Angela’s Ashes”, by Frank McCourt

The Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir Angela’s Ashes tells the story of Frank McCourt who grew up in the slums of Limerick, Ireland. He writes about the lingering poverty, famine and cruelty of his neighbors and loved ones as his mother struggles to keep her children alive. Despite the hardships, his writing is imbued with humor and forgiveness.

“The undocumented Americans”, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

In her book, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio tells the stories of undocumented immigrants from all over the country. It highlights the people who worked to clean up Ground Zero after 9/11; Flint, Michigan, residents who did not have state IDs to receive clean drinking water, and many more, to shed light on what it means to live an undocumented life in America.

“On Earth, we are briefly beautiful”, by Ocean Vuong

In this semi-autographic novel, Ocean Vuong writes a letter from an American narrator of Vietnamese descent to his mother, who cannot read. He writes on the themes of race, class, sexuality and gender with brutal honesty. The book reads almost like a poem as Vuong shares moments, ideas and memories in snippets throughout the novel.

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Spokane Cops Read Children’s Book Written by Controversial “Killology” Coach to Preschoolers | Local News | Spokane | The interior of the Pacific Northwest https://hiocpely.com/spokane-cops-read-childrens-book-written-by-controversial-killology-coach-to-preschoolers-local-news-spokane-the-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ https://hiocpely.com/spokane-cops-read-childrens-book-written-by-controversial-killology-coach-to-preschoolers-local-news-spokane-the-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 01:14:57 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/spokane-cops-read-childrens-book-written-by-controversial-killology-coach-to-preschoolers-local-news-spokane-the-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Click to enlarge Spokane Police Department (Facebook) Spokane Police Officer Graig Butler reading a children’s book written by controversial police trainer Dave Grossman THElast week, on his Facebook page, the Spokane Police Department posted footage of what at first glance showed perfectly harmless scenes: young preschool and kindergarten children laughing inside a patrol car, children […]]]>

Click to enlarge

Spokane Police Department (Facebook)

Spokane Police Officer Graig Butler reading a children’s book written by controversial police trainer Dave Grossman

THElast week, on his Facebook page, the Spokane Police Department posted footage of what at first glance showed perfectly harmless scenes: young preschool and kindergarten children laughing inside a patrol car, children proudly wearing sticker badges and an officer reading a children’s story.

But one to look closer aroused outrage. The story that an officer read to the children? It’s called Sheepdogs: meet the warriors of our nation, and it’s co-authored by Dave Grossman, the guy who founded the controversial “Killology” training that critics say encourages police violence by training officers to see citizens as a threat.

Last year, thousands of Spokane citizens signed a petition calling on Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich to cancel planned Grossman training in Spokane, and Spokane City Council subsequently condemned Grossman’s training.

Breean, Chairman of Spokane City Council Beggs says the goal should be to try to bridge the gap between the police and the community, and Beggs argues that Grossman’s trainings do the opposite.

“I reject that worldview and think it’s very counterproductive,” Beggs says.

Julie Humphreys, spokesperson for the Spokane Police Department, said it wasn’t just the police department who picked this book to read at the Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church’s early learning center. The school has the book in its library and invited Agent Graig Butler to read it for the past three years. (The school did not respond to a Interior request for comment Wednesday.)

Still, Humphreys says the department doesn’t see a problem with reading the book.

“SPD supports the book because it describes the role of law enforcement in protecting and serving communities,” Humphreys said. “Agents are paid to keep communities safe and help solve problems. Educating the public, including children, about the role and function of an agent is part of community outreach.

The children’s book, also co-authored by an elementary school teacher, is a digest of the so-called “shepherd dog analogy” popular on the right and introduced by Grossman in his 2004 book, On combat, the psychology and physiology of deadly conflicts in war and in peace. Yes, this is the basis of a famous monologue by American sniper.

Indeed, an extract from In combat explaining the analogy with the sheepdog is presented at the end of the children’s book.

As Sheepdog explains, it’s a worldview that basically boils down to this: there are sheep, representing most citizens who are oblivious – or in denial – of the dangers that surround them. Then there are wolves who want to hurt sheep and don’t care about others. And then, of course, there are the sheepdogs willing to sacrifice themselves to save the otherwise helpless sheep from the big bad wolves.

The children’s book isn’t very subtle about who the sheepdogs are. They are usually police or soldiers – with little distinction between the two. Sheepdogs represents sheepdogs in police or military uniform. At one point, the children’s book shows a sheepdog holding what looks like a military-style rifle crawling under barbed wire.

Click to enlarge An excerpt from the children's book co-authored by Dave Grossman and Stephanie Rogish

An excerpt from the children’s book co-authored by Dave Grossman and Stephanie Rogish

“It takes a predator to catch a predator, so sheepdogs spend their lives practicing their skills and using force,” he says under the cartoon illustration. “They feed their desire to protect and keep the innocent.”

Grossman’s original sheepdog analogy explains that sheep “live in denial,” although he insists in his essay that he doesn’t mean anything negative by that. On the contrary, he explains, sheep without sheepdogs are like eggs without a shell, and the police, soldiers and “other warriors” are that shell.

The children’s book explains that sheep (the audience) don’t always want sheepdogs (the police) but need their help nonetheless.

“When do they change their mind? When the wolf comes! Then the whole flock tries to hide behind the nearest sheepdog,” the book says.

The children’s story says that sheepdogs can be anyone else willing to sacrifice themselves for other sheep, whether they are in uniform or not. And it ends with a reminder that people are not like animals because they can choose who they want to be. Yet he still only gives those three options: a sheep, a wolf, or a sheepdog.

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Click to enlarge In sheepdogs, sheep run to sheepdogs when they need protection from wolves.

In Sheepdogs, sheep run to sheepdogs when they need protection from wolves.

This shepherd dog analogy is central to the “warrior” mentality that Grossman teaches. And that’s a major part of what Grossman’s critics oppose.

Andrew Biviano, a local civil rights lawyer, argues that instead of warriors, the police should see themselves more as guardians. And there is a big difference. If the police respond to a person with a mental health crisis with a “warrior” mindset, they may find it necessary in some way to. defeat that person, instead of protecting them like any other citizen, he said.

“A warrior mindset says there are good guys and bad guys and we have to destroy the bad guys,” Biviano says. “It is a fundamental problem that it is dangerous to teach our children.”

People who commit crimes are not always “evil wolves,” as the sheepdog analogy suggests, Biviano says. It could be a teenager making the wrong choice to steal who is running away from the police because he is afraid.

“People who have committed crimes are not wolves,” says Biviano. “These are people who made a mistake.”

Beggs also disagrees with the sheepdog worldview – not only with the idea that criminals are always bad, but also that the rest of society is powerless to protect themselves.

“People involved in criminal justice recognize that it is much more complex. Perpetrators are victims too, and victims also potentially become perpetrators,” Beggs said.

While there are certainly life-saving situations for police officers, Beggs says, the sheepdog analogy is overly simplistic.

The Spokane Police Department never formally invited Grossman for training, although Humphreys says some officers may have taken training from other agencies. She says since the school visit last week, community outreach workers have received “a collection of thank you notes from students who have enjoyed her visit and appreciated hearing that the officers are parents too,” neighbors and community members “.

Beggs points out that the officers he speaks to generally don’t consider human behavior as black and white as Grossman’s sheepdog analogy. And although he is “concerned” and “disappointed” that this book was read to children, he says he strongly believes in the First Amendment and does not think the government should decide which books the police can and cannot. read to children. .

Still, he says the outlook for reading this book to children is not good.

“I think it’s great that city employees take the time to interact with the kids. But of all the books that could have been picked up for promotion on our police department’s website,” said Beggs, “I wish it wasn’t that one.”


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In Paris, it is once again the season of literary scandals https://hiocpely.com/in-paris-it-is-once-again-the-season-of-literary-scandals/ https://hiocpely.com/in-paris-it-is-once-again-the-season-of-literary-scandals/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 15:11:07 +0000 https://hiocpely.com/in-paris-it-is-once-again-the-season-of-literary-scandals/ PARIS – The sidewalks of Paris were already littered with fallen chestnuts by the time the first scandal of the literary season finally erupted. Most of September, as French publishers release their most promising books and start fighting for prizes, the literary world is engulfed in the Left Bank version of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. […]]]>

PARIS – The sidewalks of Paris were already littered with fallen chestnuts by the time the first scandal of the literary season finally erupted.

Most of September, as French publishers release their most promising books and start fighting for prizes, the literary world is engulfed in the Left Bank version of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.

This season had gone smoothly – abnormally, impossible, some literary observers joked – until problems hit the only French literary grand prix known for its probity: the Goncourt, standard bearer of the French novel at 118 years old, whose laureates are Marcel Proust, Simone de Beauvoir and Marguerite Duras.

Things started when the 10 jurors of Goncourt gathered this month, over a roast duckling lunch with cherries and bottles of Chateau Maucaillou 2015, to put together their long list of suitors. The author of a book under study turned out to be the romantic partner of one of the jurors, Camille Laurens, novelist and literary critic at Le Monde. In fact, the book was dedicated to a certain “CL”

Still, the jury decided, by a vote of 7 to 3, to include the book on its list. Ms. Laurens was in the majority.

Similar votes by juries deciding other book grand prix in France – who have firmly rejected redesigns to make themselves fairer and more transparent – may not have raised eyebrows. But the Goncourt was different: the changes made since 2008 had undoubtedly made it more honest and credible.

But the spearhead of the overhaul – Bernard Pivot, legendary figure of the French book, known for his uprightness – retired as president of Goncourt at the end of 2019. In the cafes of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, the redoubt From the Left Bank to the French literary class, a common topic of conversation was whether the changes would survive Mr. Pivot’s departure.

Speaking for the first time on the scandal, Mr. Pivot said he was “surprised” and “shocked” by Goncourt’s decision to include the book in question on his list.

“It is obvious that as president of the Académie Goncourt, I would not have agreed to put the book of a husband or a wife or a lover on a list,” said Mr. Pivot in an interview, his voice rising in anger.

He added that “what makes you refuse to include on a list a book whose author is close to a member of Goncourt, it is common sense”.

The stakes are high. Announced each year in November, the award-winning novel at Goncourt automatically becomes a Christmas present by default. Last year’s winner, “L’Anomalie”, sold over a million copies, an astronomical number in France.

The collusion between the great French literary juries was put in the spotlight last year when some jurors of Renaudot, the second most prestigious prize, admitted having crowned a pedophile writer, Gabriel Matzneff, in 2013 because they were friends with him and wanted to cheer him up as he went through a rough patch.

At Renaudot and other grand prix, jurors openly campaign for books in which they have a personal or professional interest. Some judges are also editors at large publishing houses and defend the titles of their employers – or books they have edited themselves.

Before the changes in Goncourt, it too was qualified by some critics as “the Goncourt mafia”, recalled the current president of the jury, Didier Decoin, who has been a juror since 1995.

But under Mr. Pivot, the Goncourts implemented far-reaching changes: jurors could no longer be employed in publishing houses, and they would no longer be appointed for life. They now have to retire at age 80 and they actually have to read the proposed books.

The effect was immediate. A New York Times analysis showed that in the decade leading up to the 2008 reviews, nearly two of Goncourt’s 10 judges in any given year had ties to the winner’s publisher. But since 2008, the number of judges with these links has dropped to one.

Thanks to the changes, once small publishers like Actes Sud – which had been almost excluded from Goncourt because it refused to lobby for awards – were rewarded much more often. Since 2008, Actes Sud has won four Prix Goncourt.

“I think I was lucky because I have come to a time of change in practice,” said Jérôme Ferrari, who won the Goncourt in 2012 for his novel “The Sermon on the Fall of Rome” , said in an interview last year.

Earlier this month, as the jurors of Goncourt gathered for lunch at Drouant, a Parisian restaurant where jury meetings have been held for a century, they drew up a list of 16 novels. But one title required a special vote: “Cadillac children», Whose author, François Noudelmann, is Ms. Laurens’ partner. By show of hands, the jury decided that there was no conflict of interest, in part because Ms Laurens and Mr Noudelmann were not married or in a civil union.

In an email interview, Ms Laurens, who became a juror last year, said she was open about her relationship and “never encouraged other jurors” to read the book.

Yet some members, including the chairman, Mr. Decoin, were surprised that she voted.

“I thought she was not going to vote,” said Mr Decoin, who was in the minority of the three. “So she voted. It’s weird, but it’s his business.

Philippe Claudel, who is the secretary general of the jury and was in the majority of the seven votes, said there are no rules of procedure prohibiting Ms Laurens from voting.

“In my opinion, we cannot blame Camille Laurens for having broken a rule that does not exist,” said Mr. Claudel.

There was also no rule, he added, preventing her from doing what she did next.

Nine days after Le Goncourt published her list, Ms. Laurens, in her column in Le Monde, has dedicated another book to it: “The postcard”, by Anne Berest.

The alarm was raised in literary circles because the “Postcard” was considered as a direct competitor of “The children of Cadillac” of his companion. Both novels dealt with similar themes – Jewish exiles in France and the Holocaust – but “The Postcard” had won much praise and sales, while “The Children of Cadillac” had received little attention.

Ms Laurens’ examination also drew attention because of its “unheard-of brutality”, according to France Inter, a public radio station, which first exposed the conflict of interest. The Obs, a weekly, said that the review turned to personal attacks on Ms Berest, describing her as an “expert on Parisian chic” and entering a gas chamber with “her big red-soled clogs”. The book, Ms. Laurens wrote, was “Shoah for idiots.”

In her email, Ms Laurens said she wrote the review before Le Goncourt decided on her long list. She was an “independent critic” and was singled out for being a woman, she said.

“This isn’t the first time I’ve written a scathing book review,” she said. “And again, I find that my arguments are never argued and people prefer to say that I am ‘brutal’ and ‘vicious’.”

But Jean-Yves Mollier, specialist in the history of French publishing, said the review was part of an ancestral jockey for literary prizes.

“She outright murdered one of the candidates,” Mollier said.

Mr Decoin said he would push for a new rule that would require a juror with a conflict of interest to abstain from voting. Mr. Claudel said he agreed, but pointed out that the current jurors were as committed to ethics as Mr. Pivot was.

“Bernard Pivot is a fine moral figure, and I think everyone around the table is too,” he said. “It would be extremely inappropriate to say that morality rests on one person. “


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